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The MDGs and Sustainable Rural Development in sub-Saharan Africa: Challenges and Implications for Education for Rural People (ERP)

Ministerial Seminar on Education for Rural People in Africa: Policy Lessons, Options and Priorities - hosted by the Government of Ethiopia - 7–9 September 2005, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia








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    Education for rural people and food security
    A cross country analysis
    2007
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    Education for Rural People (ERP) is crucial to achieving by 2015 the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of eradicating extreme poverty and hunger (No. 1), achieving universal primary education (No. 2), promoting gender equality (No. 3) and ensuring environmental sustainability (No. 7). The World Food Summit, held in Rome in 1996, highlighted the need to increase access to education for the poor and the members of disadvantaged groups, including rural people, in order to achieve pove rty eradication, food security, durable peace and sustainable development. The 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD), held in Johannesburg, also emphasized the role of education. As the majority of the world’s poor, illiterate and undernourished live in rural areas, it is a major challenge to ensure their access to quality education. The lack of learning opportunities is directly related to rural poverty. Hence, education and training strategies need to be integrated within sustainable rural development strategies, through plans of action that are multisectoral and interdisciplinary. This means creating new partnerships among policy-makers and practitioners working in agriculture and rural development and those working in education.
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    Wildlife law and the legal empowerment of the poor in Sub-Saharan Africa: new case studies 2009
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    This is the second legal study focusing on wildlife legislation and the empowerment of the poor in Sub-Saharan Africa. It follows up on FAO Legal Paper Online 77 “Wildlife law and the legal empowerment of the poor in Sub-Saharan Africa” that was published in May 2009 (www.fao.org/Legal/prs-ol/lpo75.pdf).1 The purpose of this second paper is to analyze wildlife legislation in an additional fifteen African countries, and assess how similar issues (such as wildlife tenure, community-based wildlife management, benefit-sharing, public participation in decision-making and law enforcement, and human-wildlife conflicts) have been addressed. The lens through which available legislation has been analyzed is the concept of “legal empowerment of the poor,” as developed by the Commission on Legal Empowerment of the Poor, established under the aegis of the United Nations between 2005 and 2008.2 Accordingly, national legal frameworks were examined in their potential to support the objective of effect ive regulation of wildlife management to promote environmental sustainability and socio-economic development with a view to allowing all members of society, and particularly disadvantaged people, to directly benefit from sustainable wildlife management. Thus, the study sought to evaluate whether wildlife legislation can significantly contribute to improving food security, alleviating poverty and enhancing rural livelihoods, by fulfilling international obligations and following best practices rel ated to the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity.
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    Higher education for rural development: the experience of the University of Cordoba 2005
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    Education for rural people is crucial to achieving both the Education for All (EFA) goals, and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of eradicating extreme poverty and hunger, ensuring universal primary education by 2015, promoting gender equity and ensuring environmental sustainability. In 1996, the World Food Summit in Rome stressed increased access to education for the poor and members of disadvantaged groups, including rural people, as a key to achieving poverty eradication, food sec urity, durable peace and sustainable development. The 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development, held in Johannesburg, also emphasized the role of education. As the majority of the world’s poor, illiterate and undernourished live in rural areas, it is a major challenge to ensure their access to quality education. The lack of learning opportunities is both a cause and an effect of rural poverty. Hence, education and training strategies need to be integrated within all aspects of sustai nable rural development, through plans of action that are multisectoral and interdisciplinary. This means creating new partnerships between people working in agriculture and rural development, and people working in education.

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