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Nutrition-sensitive Farmer Field Schools in Kenya’s Kalobeyei settlement

Strengthening the capacity of refugees and host communities to produce, process and consume nutritious food in Turkana County











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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Combining nutrition education and rural livelihood support in Kenya
    Trials of Improved Practices (TIPs) and food related interventions in Kitui county
    2021
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    The arid and semi-arid areas (ASALs) of Kenya cover nearly 84 percent of the national land and thus present an enormous potential contribution to national agricultural production as well as basic food and income for farmers residing in these areas. About three in every ten Kenyan children aged below two years are stunted. According to the Kenya Demographic Health Survey conducted in 2014, Kitui county and West Pokot county had the highest stunting rates nationally at almost 46 percent. This is against a national average stunting rate of 26 percent. There have been multiple past projects in Kitui county that aimed at improving food security and nutrition, including through the promotion of exclusive breastfeeding, growth monitoring, immunization, complementary feeding and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH). The United States Agency for International Development (USAID)-funded Increasing Smallholder Productivity and Profitability (ISPP) project, implemented between September 2016 and March 2020, was designed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) to combine nutrition education with rural livelihood support. This approach aimed at strengthening the capacity of smallholder farmers in agricultural production, water management, and farming as a business. Furthermore, it aimed at improving nutrition outcomes of targeted household members in the semi-arid counties of Kitui, Machakos, Makueni, Taita-Taveta, and Tharaka-Nithi. The project had a specific component on Trials of Improved Practices (TIPs), aimed at improving infant and young child feeding practices.
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    Champs-Écoles des producteurs sensibles à la nutrition à Kalobeyei au Kenya
    Renforcer les capacités des réfugiés et des communautés d’accueil à produire, transformer et consommer des aliments nutritifs dans le comté de Turkana
    2021
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    L’agriculture est le moyen d’existence principal de la majorité des Kenyans, et elle représente 26 pour cent du produit intérieur brut (PIB). Dans les zones rurales, plus de 70 pour cent de l’emploi informel provient de l’agriculture. Dans les zones arides et semi-arides, les sécheresses récurrentes et les conditions climatiques irrégulières ont entraîné une faible productivité, des pénuries alimentaires et des hausses de prix, qui compromettent gravement les résultats nutritionnels. En dépit des progrès réalisés ces dernières années, un enfant de moins de cinq ans sur quatre (26 pour cent des enfants) au Kenya souffre de malnutrition chronique, tandis que les taux de malnutrition aiguë chez les enfants restent élevés dans les zones arides et semi-arides. Les déplacements de population et les conflits ont encore aggravé la malnutrition et l’insécurité alimentaire. Le Kenya accueille 494 585 réfugiés et demandeurs d’asile. Parmi eux, 186 000 vivent dans le comté de Turkana, pour la plupart répartis entre le camp de réfugiés de Kakuma et Kalobeyei. Les interventions visant uniquement à accroître la production agricole ne se sont pas nécessairement traduites par une amélioration de la nutrition ou du régime alimentaire. Dans ce contexte, la FAO a encouragé la création de champs-écoles des producteurs sensibles à la nutrition, qui proposent des sessions de formation animées par des membres des communautés, portant sur la production végétale et animale, avec des modules nutritionnels supplémentaires d’un mois sur la production, la transformation, la conservation et la préparation culinaire d’aliments riches en éléments nutritifs.
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    Climate Resistant Agricultural Livelihoods in Kenya - GCP/KEN/081/IFA 2023
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    Agriculture is the mainstay of the Kenyan economy, contributing 26 percent of gross domestic product directly, and 25 percent indirectly. The sector accounts for 65 percent of Kenya’s total exports and provides over 70 percent of informal employment in rural areas, representing the means of livelihood for the majority of Kenyan people. Arid and semi-arid lands (ASALs) cover nearly 80 percent of Kenya and present an enormous potential contribution to national agricultural production, as well as basic food and income for farmers residing in these areas. However, the ASALs have the lowest development indicators and the highest incidence of poverty in the country; food security is thus a major concern in the ASALs and the country at large. The KCEP-CRAL programme was an expansion of the Kenya Cereal Enhancement Programme, which became effective in April 2014 through a partnership between the Government of Kenya, the European Union, and IFAD. The main objective of the programme was to improve the economic potential of smallholders in Kenya’s ASALs and their ability to handle their natural resources and resilience to climate change in an increasingly vulnerable ecosystem, and to reduce rural poverty and food insecurity among these populations.

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