Thumbnail Image

Report of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Consultation on the Risks and Benefits of Fish Consumption. Rome, 25-29 january 2010












FAO/WHO. Report of the Joint Expert Consultation on the Risks and Benefits of Fish Consumption. Rome, 25¿29 January 2010. FAO Fishery and Aquaculture Report. No. 978. Rome, FAO. 2011. 50 pp.


Also available in:

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    Human dietary exposure to chemicals in sub-Saharan Africa: safety assessment through a total diet study 2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Background Human dietary exposure to chemicals can result in a wide range of adverse health effects. Some substances might cause non-communicable diseases, including cancer and coronary heart diseases, and could be nephrotoxic. Food is the main human exposure route for many chemicals. We aimed to assess human dietary exposure to a wide range of food chemicals. Methods We did a total diet study in Benin, Cameroon, Mali, and Nigeria. We assessed 4020 representative samples of foods, prepared as consumed, which covered more than 90% of the diet of 7291 households from eight study centres. By combining representative dietary surveys of countries with findings for concentrations of 872 chemicals in foods, we characterised human dietary exposure. Findings Exposure to lead could result in increases in adult blood pressure up to 2·0 mm Hg, whereas children might lose 8·8–13·3 IQ points (95th percentile in Kano, Nigeria). Morbidity factors caused by coexposure to aflatoxin B1 and hepatitis B virus, and sterigmatocystin and fumonisins, suggest several thousands of additional liver cancer cases per year, and a substantial contribution to the burden of chronic malnutrition in childhood. Exposure to 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from consumption of smoked fish and edible oils exceeded levels associated with possible carcinogenicity and genotoxicity health concerns in all study centres. Exposure to aluminium, ochratoxin A, and citrinin indicated a public health concern about nephropathies. From 470 pesticides tested across the four countries, only high concentrations of chlorpyrifos in smoked fish (unauthorised practice identified in Mali) could pose a human health risk. Interpretation Risks characterised by this total diet study underscore specific priorities in terms of food safety management in sub-Saharan Africa. Similar investigations specifically targeting children are crucially needed.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Policy brief
    Policy Brief. The unlocked potential of inland fish to contribute to improved nutrition in Sri Lanka 2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Protein-energy malnutrition and micro-nutrient deficiencies are important public health issues in Sri Lanka. Fish play a crucial role in nutrition and thus, promoting fish in the diet is among the strategies to control protein-energy malnutrition and micro-nutrient deficiencies. Fish are a source of proteins and healthy fats and provide a unique source of essential nutrients, including long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, iodine, vitamin D and calcium. Furthermore, fish are ideal options for maintaining good health and weight management as they are low in cholesterol and thus recommended for patients with diabetes, coronary heart diseases and hypertension over other animal proteins. Despite their health benefits, expenditure on purchase of inland fish in Sri Lanka is low, with the average Sri Lankan spending only LKR 477.25 per month (~USD2.8) in 2016 on fresh fish from fresh waters (inland fish) and sea waters. Furthermore, despite the productive potential of inland fish, availability remains an issue, contributing to approximately 16 percent of the total fish production in Sri Lanka in 2016. These figures show that there is a great unharnessed potential to develop the inland fish value chain and promote its consumption as an avenue to improve the nutritional status of the Sri Lankan population. Furthermore, the extent of water bodies available in the country, and the natural and artificial environments within which inland fishers operate, serve as an ideal environment to promote the production of inland fish. In this respect, this policy brief discusses the potential of introducing more inland fish to the diets of Sri Lankans, particularly vulnerable groups.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Rapport de la Consultation mixte d'experts sur les risques et bénéfices de la consommation de poisson. Rome, 25-29 janvier 2010 2013
    Also available in:

    L’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture et l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé ont organisé, du 25 au 29 janvier 2010, une consultation mixte d’experts sur les risques et bénéfices de la consommation de poisson. Elle avait pour mission d’étudier des données sur les concentrations de nutriments (acides gras oméga-3 à longue chaîne) et de certains contaminants chimiques (méthylmercure et dioxines) dans certaines espèces de poissons et de comparer, du point de vue de la santé, les bénéfices et l’apport en nutriments attribuables à la consommation de poisson aux risques liés à la présence de contaminants dans le poisson. La Consultation d’experts a tiré plusieurs conclusions concernant les bénéfices et les risques de la consommation de poisson pour la santé et a recommandé aux États Membres de prendre une série de mesures pour mieux évaluer et gérer les risques et les bénéfices de la consommation de poisson et en informer plus efficacement leur s citoyens. La Consultation d’experts a mis au point un cadre pour évaluer les bénéfices ou les risques nets de la consommation de poisson pour la santé, qui permettra d’orienter les travaux des autorités nationales chargées de la sécurité sanitaire des aliments et ceux de la Commission du Codex Alimentarius sur la gestion des risques, compte tenu des données existantes sur les bénéfices de la consommation de poisson. La Consultation d’experts est parvenue aux conclusions suivantes: Le poisson est une source d’énergie, de protéines et de plusieurs autres nutriments importants, notamment d’acides gras polyinsaturés à longue chaîne n-3 (AGPI LC n-3). La consommation de poisson fait partie des traditions culturelles de nombreux peuples. Dans certaines populations, le poisson est un aliment important et une source principale de nutriments essentiels. Dans la population adulte générale, la consommation de poisson, notamment de poisson gras, réduit le risque de décès pa r cardiopathie coronarienne. Il n’existe pas de preuve probable ou convaincante d’un risque de cardiopathie coronarienne associé au méthylmercure. Les risques potentiels de cancer associés aux dioxines sont bien inférieurs aux bénéfices avérés de la consommation de poisson en termes de cardiopathie coronarienne. Si l’on compare les bénéfices des AGPI LC n-3 aux risques que représente le méthylmercure pour les femmes en âge de procréer, dans la plupart des situations évaluées, la consomma tion de poisson par la mère réduit le risque que le développement neurologique de l’enfant ne soit pas optimal. Lorsque les niveaux d’exposition de la mère aux dioxines (présentes dans le poisson et d’autres aliments) ne dépassent pas la dose mensuelle tolérable provisoire (PTMI) de 70 pg/kg de poids corporel, fixée par le JECFA (pour les PCDD, les PCDF et les PCB coplanaires), le risque pour le développement neurologique du foetus est négligeable. Lorsque les niveaux d’exposition de l a mère aux dioxines (présentes dans le poisson et d’autres aliments) dépassent la dose mensuelle tolérable provisoire, il se peut que ce risque ne soit plus négligeable. Concernant le nourrisson, le jeune enfant et l’adolescent, les données disponibles sont actuellement insuffisantes pour établir un cadre quantitatif des risques et des bénéfices de la consommation de poisson pour la santé. Cependant, l’adoption dès un jeune âge de régimes alimentaires sains comprenant du poisson influe s ur les habitudes alimentaires et la santé à l’âge adulte.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Article
    Human dietary exposure to chemicals in sub-Saharan Africa: safety assessment through a total diet study 2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Background Human dietary exposure to chemicals can result in a wide range of adverse health effects. Some substances might cause non-communicable diseases, including cancer and coronary heart diseases, and could be nephrotoxic. Food is the main human exposure route for many chemicals. We aimed to assess human dietary exposure to a wide range of food chemicals. Methods We did a total diet study in Benin, Cameroon, Mali, and Nigeria. We assessed 4020 representative samples of foods, prepared as consumed, which covered more than 90% of the diet of 7291 households from eight study centres. By combining representative dietary surveys of countries with findings for concentrations of 872 chemicals in foods, we characterised human dietary exposure. Findings Exposure to lead could result in increases in adult blood pressure up to 2·0 mm Hg, whereas children might lose 8·8–13·3 IQ points (95th percentile in Kano, Nigeria). Morbidity factors caused by coexposure to aflatoxin B1 and hepatitis B virus, and sterigmatocystin and fumonisins, suggest several thousands of additional liver cancer cases per year, and a substantial contribution to the burden of chronic malnutrition in childhood. Exposure to 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from consumption of smoked fish and edible oils exceeded levels associated with possible carcinogenicity and genotoxicity health concerns in all study centres. Exposure to aluminium, ochratoxin A, and citrinin indicated a public health concern about nephropathies. From 470 pesticides tested across the four countries, only high concentrations of chlorpyrifos in smoked fish (unauthorised practice identified in Mali) could pose a human health risk. Interpretation Risks characterised by this total diet study underscore specific priorities in terms of food safety management in sub-Saharan Africa. Similar investigations specifically targeting children are crucially needed.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Policy brief
    Policy Brief. The unlocked potential of inland fish to contribute to improved nutrition in Sri Lanka 2019
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Protein-energy malnutrition and micro-nutrient deficiencies are important public health issues in Sri Lanka. Fish play a crucial role in nutrition and thus, promoting fish in the diet is among the strategies to control protein-energy malnutrition and micro-nutrient deficiencies. Fish are a source of proteins and healthy fats and provide a unique source of essential nutrients, including long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, iodine, vitamin D and calcium. Furthermore, fish are ideal options for maintaining good health and weight management as they are low in cholesterol and thus recommended for patients with diabetes, coronary heart diseases and hypertension over other animal proteins. Despite their health benefits, expenditure on purchase of inland fish in Sri Lanka is low, with the average Sri Lankan spending only LKR 477.25 per month (~USD2.8) in 2016 on fresh fish from fresh waters (inland fish) and sea waters. Furthermore, despite the productive potential of inland fish, availability remains an issue, contributing to approximately 16 percent of the total fish production in Sri Lanka in 2016. These figures show that there is a great unharnessed potential to develop the inland fish value chain and promote its consumption as an avenue to improve the nutritional status of the Sri Lankan population. Furthermore, the extent of water bodies available in the country, and the natural and artificial environments within which inland fishers operate, serve as an ideal environment to promote the production of inland fish. In this respect, this policy brief discusses the potential of introducing more inland fish to the diets of Sri Lankans, particularly vulnerable groups.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (series)
    Rapport de la Consultation mixte d'experts sur les risques et bénéfices de la consommation de poisson. Rome, 25-29 janvier 2010 2013
    Also available in:

    L’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture et l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé ont organisé, du 25 au 29 janvier 2010, une consultation mixte d’experts sur les risques et bénéfices de la consommation de poisson. Elle avait pour mission d’étudier des données sur les concentrations de nutriments (acides gras oméga-3 à longue chaîne) et de certains contaminants chimiques (méthylmercure et dioxines) dans certaines espèces de poissons et de comparer, du point de vue de la santé, les bénéfices et l’apport en nutriments attribuables à la consommation de poisson aux risques liés à la présence de contaminants dans le poisson. La Consultation d’experts a tiré plusieurs conclusions concernant les bénéfices et les risques de la consommation de poisson pour la santé et a recommandé aux États Membres de prendre une série de mesures pour mieux évaluer et gérer les risques et les bénéfices de la consommation de poisson et en informer plus efficacement leur s citoyens. La Consultation d’experts a mis au point un cadre pour évaluer les bénéfices ou les risques nets de la consommation de poisson pour la santé, qui permettra d’orienter les travaux des autorités nationales chargées de la sécurité sanitaire des aliments et ceux de la Commission du Codex Alimentarius sur la gestion des risques, compte tenu des données existantes sur les bénéfices de la consommation de poisson. La Consultation d’experts est parvenue aux conclusions suivantes: Le poisson est une source d’énergie, de protéines et de plusieurs autres nutriments importants, notamment d’acides gras polyinsaturés à longue chaîne n-3 (AGPI LC n-3). La consommation de poisson fait partie des traditions culturelles de nombreux peuples. Dans certaines populations, le poisson est un aliment important et une source principale de nutriments essentiels. Dans la population adulte générale, la consommation de poisson, notamment de poisson gras, réduit le risque de décès pa r cardiopathie coronarienne. Il n’existe pas de preuve probable ou convaincante d’un risque de cardiopathie coronarienne associé au méthylmercure. Les risques potentiels de cancer associés aux dioxines sont bien inférieurs aux bénéfices avérés de la consommation de poisson en termes de cardiopathie coronarienne. Si l’on compare les bénéfices des AGPI LC n-3 aux risques que représente le méthylmercure pour les femmes en âge de procréer, dans la plupart des situations évaluées, la consomma tion de poisson par la mère réduit le risque que le développement neurologique de l’enfant ne soit pas optimal. Lorsque les niveaux d’exposition de la mère aux dioxines (présentes dans le poisson et d’autres aliments) ne dépassent pas la dose mensuelle tolérable provisoire (PTMI) de 70 pg/kg de poids corporel, fixée par le JECFA (pour les PCDD, les PCDF et les PCB coplanaires), le risque pour le développement neurologique du foetus est négligeable. Lorsque les niveaux d’exposition de l a mère aux dioxines (présentes dans le poisson et d’autres aliments) dépassent la dose mensuelle tolérable provisoire, il se peut que ce risque ne soit plus négligeable. Concernant le nourrisson, le jeune enfant et l’adolescent, les données disponibles sont actuellement insuffisantes pour établir un cadre quantitatif des risques et des bénéfices de la consommation de poisson pour la santé. Cependant, l’adoption dès un jeune âge de régimes alimentaires sains comprenant du poisson influe s ur les habitudes alimentaires et la santé à l’âge adulte.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.