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Cash transfer programmes for managing climate risk: evidence from a randomized experiment in Zambia










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    The household- and individual-level economic impacts of cash transfer programmes in Sub-Saharan Africa 2017
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    This report synthesizes the analysis and findings of a set of seven country impact evaluation studies that explore the impact of cash transfer programmes on household economic decision-making, productive activities and labour allocation in sub-Saharan Africa. The seven countries are Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Results from seven recently completed rigorous impact evaluations of government-run unconditional social cash transfer programmes in sub-Saharan Africa s how that these programmes have significant positive impacts on the livelihoods of beneficiary households. In Zambia, the Child Grant programme had large and positive impacts across an array of income generating activities. The impact of the programmes in Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi and Zimbabwe were more selective in nature, while the Livelihood Empowerment Against Poverty programme in Ghana had fewer direct impacts on productive activities, and more on various dimensions of risk management .
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    Evaluating the impacts of cash and complementary agricultural support interventions in fragile settings
    The case of Somalia
    2022
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    This study examines the FAO cash plus agriculture program in Somalia. This multi-faceted intervention provides agricultural inputs, training and cash transfers to vulnerable agro-pastoralist households living in districts and villages that experienced severe weather shocks. We exploit variations in the implementation of this program to assess the effect of receiving inputs only and inputs plus cash on a range of protective and productive outcomes. Specifically, we make use of household survey data collected in 2019 and apply a quasi-experimental Inverse Probability Weighted Regression Analysis (IPWRA) matching approach to estimate the impact of the two different interventions on food security, assets, adoption of inputs and adoption of agricultural practices. We find positive and significant impacts on a number of productive outcomes and some difference between the two treatments: while inputs seem to increase asset wealth, cash plus reduces food insecurity and higher levels of income diversification, suggesting that the cash component facilitates investments in livelihoods diversification. Moreover, we find evidence of heterogeneous impacts under conditions of weather shocks, and between socio-economic segments of the population.
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    Qualitative case study on social cash transfers and livelihood support in Lesotho
    Lesotho Country Case Study Report
    2018
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    This in-depth qualitative study in Lesotho examines the impacts of linkages between the Lesotho Child Grants Programme (CGP), the second largest national social protection programme supporting poor households with children 0-17 years, and the Sustainable Poverty Reduction through Income, Nutrition and Access to Government services (SPRINGS) pilot project, implemented by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) through UNICEF and European Union financing. It explores impacts of these combined programmes – namely social assistance through cash transfer and livelihood support, both at the household and at the local economy level and examines in-depth the causal links and channels - the how and why – that create these impacts, particularly regarding the areas of interest of this study: economic security and resilience and nutritional knowledge, dietary practices and infant and child care, as well as operational features. The study aims to provide insight and understanding of combined programme benefits, drawbacks and processes to inform government policy and programme decisionmaking. This particularly of priority as government is on the cusp of revising and rolling out an expanded social assistance livelihoods programme, supported notably by the World Bank. This is an opportune form of analytical evidence to generate informed decisions at national level. It is of great value to government who has already indicated interest in the drafts’ findings. It will certainly inform a wider audience notably in Africa and also globally on benefits of multi-sectoral coordination approaches in poverty reduction efforts.

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