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Renewable energy for agri-food systems: Towards the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement










IRENA and FAO. 2021. Renewable energy for agri-food systems – Towards the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris agreement. Abu Dhabi and Rome. 




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    Booklet
    The role of social protection in strengthening local food systems and inclusive rural transformation
    A case study of the Kenya Home-grown School Meal Programme
    2023
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    Social protection programs can contribute towards food system transformation by targeting purposively one or multiple outcomes. At the 2021 Food Systems Summit, convened by the UN Secretary-General, Home Grown School Feeding programmes were considered as a game changer for strengthening local food systems globally. This case study analyzes and demonstrates how the Kenya Home-Grown School meal Programme interacts with and can have synergistic impacts on the key results of the food system: improving food security and nutrition, providing adequate livelihoods for farmers and food producers, and contributing to environmental sustainability. It identifies and proposes changes in the design of its cash modality, and the areas that require increased programmatic and structural investment, to realize its full potential through its multiple benefit pathways. It will lead to an Increased understanding by member countries, development partners, and FAO staff about the linkages between Home Grown School Feeding programmes and agri-food systems. Within FAO’s Strategic Framework, the paper contributes to Better Life 2 on Inclusive rural transformation by ensuring equal participation of and benefits to poor, vulnerable, and marginalized groups through implementation of targeted policies, strategies, and programmes. It is aligned with the achievement of the 2030 Agenda through SDGs 1(No poverty), 2(Zero Hunger) and 10 (Reduced Inequalities).
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    Booklet
    Achieving SDG 2 without breaching the 1.5 °C threshold: A global roadmap, Part 1
    How agrifood systems transformation through accelerated climate actions will help achieving food security and nutrition, today and tomorrow, In brief
    2023
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    In 2022, 738.9 million people faced hunger, nearly 2.4 billion in 2022 lacked regular access to adequate food, and over 3.1 billion could not afford healthy diets. The pandemic added 120 million to the number of the chronically undernourished. In 2030, an estimated 590.3 million will suffer hunger. The planet faces crises, exceeding safe limits on six of nine planetary boundaries, and much of them is due to agrifood systems, which contribute 30 percent of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and impede climate goals. Despite the Paris Agreement's aims, warming rates point to a serious gap in meeting targets. Agrifood systems appear to face a dilemma: intensifying efforts to increase productivity while endangering climate goals – or curbing production to reduce emissions. This perceived trade-off has led to inaction and emboldens climate action skeptics who argue climate action harms efforts to address global hunger and malnutrition. Agrifood systems should address food security and nutrition needs and facilitate a large number of actions aligned with mitigation, adaptation and resilience objectives under the larger umbrella of climate action. The climate agenda itself could and should transform agrifood systems and mobilize climate finance to unlock their hidden potential. In the unfolding narrative of our global commitment to transform agrifood systems, FAO embarks on a presenting a Global Roadmap; Achieving SDG2 without breaching the 1.5C threshold. FAO's roadmap involves an extensive process that spans three years, starting with COP 28 in 2023. It commences with a global vision for what ails agrifood systems today and goes on to explore financing options for the actions required, before culminating in a discussion of how to attract concrete investment and policy packages by the time COP 30 takes place. It also examines how to integrate technical assistance into our strategies while supporting sustainable investment plans. Our objective is to create a repository of both bankable and non-bankable projects in various domains.The In Brief version of the roadmap contains the key messages and main points from the report, and is aimed at the media, policy makers and a more general public
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    Book (series)
    Fishing for development
    FAO/OECD April 2014, Paris, France
    2015
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    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the World Bank organized the Fishing for Development joint meeting, which was held in April 2014 at OECD headquarters in Paris. The meeting was convened to initiate a dialogue between the fisheries and the development policy communities from OECD and FAO Members and partner countries on key issues of shared interest. It addressed four topics high on the internation al fisheries and aquaculture policy agenda: the challenges of rebuilding fish stocks while securing the integrity of ecosystems and the livelihoods that depend on them; the potential for green growth in aquaculture; combating illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing; and the role of regional fisheries management organizations (RFMOs) in the management of high seas fish stocks and in developing cooperation between States that share fish stocks in several exclusive economic zones (EEZs). The meeting reached a number of conclusions and flagged questions for a future work agenda on policy coherence in fisheries and aquaculture. In particular, it highlighted the need to investigate and publicize the role of fisheries and aquaculture for economic development and food and nutritional security, and the opportunity cost of political inaction. It noted the lack of appropriate data, which results in the lack of tangible evidence on the sector’s contribution to economic development and po verty reduction, and how this also prevents improvements in efficiency. The meeting also agreed on the need to investigate low-cost management options and techniques tested in developing countries, such as co-management of fisheries and participatory surveillance systems. It recommended that further investigation of such options should focus on identifying the necessary preconditions for a successful outcome and how to apply them on a larger scale and in different socio-economic contexts. Anothe r conclusion was that there is a need to improve the resilience of coastal populations. The fisheries sector is often a last resort or buffer for marginalized populations, and there is an urgent need to develop alternative livelihood means (e.g. in ecotourism, aquaculture or fish processing) and social safety nets. The meeting also highlighted the need to leverage development cooperation in fisheries and aquaculture and that a major element for efficient cooperation is the sustainability of proj ect impacts. In addition, the meeting stressed the importance of ensuring that domestic fisheries policies of OECD member countries are coherent with long-term global development objectives and do not harm development prospects in developing countries. The meeting noted that developing countries do not always have the resources to monitor their EEZs effectively and suggested that OECD countries should manage and regulate their fleet’s activities outside their own EEZs more effectively. Participa nts at the meeting also agreed on the need to strengthen the fight against IUU fishing. They underlined the role of development cooperation in building capacity in developing countries and discussed the potential impacts of trade restrictions and consumption decisions. However, there were several viewpoints on import bans given the risks associated with establishing technical barriers to trade. Because some illegal fishing activities contravene international laws and may be linked to other crimi nal activities, such as human trafficking, participants agreed on the need to combat these transnational activities using appropriate tools, such as the Interpol network. The meeting made a strong call for countries to ratify the FAO Port State Measures v Agreement as soon as possible. In addition, the meeting concurred on the need to promote green growth in aquaculture, for example, through investment in productive capacity, research and infrastructure. Topics such as certification and licensin g systems were also discussed. Last, the meeting emphasized the need for developing countries to be better integrated in regional cooperation fora. Several regions suffer from a lack of coherence in actions taken by regional fisheries bodies and regional economic organizations, with overlapping competencies and a lack of political impetus. The OECD countries can help developing countries to build the necessary capacity to participate in RFMOs.

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