Thumbnail Image

Safer, stronger, better fishing boats










Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Safety at Sea - Safety Guide for Small Fishing Boats- BOBP/REP/112 2009
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Fishing is a very dangerous occupation with a high accident risk. Experience has shown that it is often when a fishery develops from traditional sail-powered craft and near shore fishing to motorized craft venturing further out to sea and with new fishing methods that accidents happen. In many developing countries, fibreglass reinforced plastic (FRP) boats are replacing traditional wooden boats and this new construction material requires new thinking when it comes to strength, stability and the ability to keep afloat when swamped. It is often difficult to do something about boats already in operation, but significant safety measures can be incorporated at relatively low cost in boats yet to be built. Close cooperation between the government departments responsible for safety legislation and the boatyards is required. The purpose of this safety guide is to present simple measures to ensure that new boats will satisfy internationally accepted safety standards. The target group c onsists of boat designers, boatbuilders, boat owners, skippers and government officials responsible for drafting new regulations and for safety supervision. This safety guide is not intended to be comprehensive and deal with all kinds of safety issues, but it will highlight the main problems and indicate what practical measures can be taken to avoid them. The guide mainly deals with small boats of less than 15min length, which, from experience are most prone to accidents. The Food and Agricu lture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO) are working together to draft new safety recommendations for decked fishing boats of less than 12 m and undecked fishing boats of any length. This work is expected to be finalized by 2010. The present guide is a revision of BOBP/MAG/16: A safety guide for small offshore fishing vessels issued by the Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP) in 1993. The main chang e is that this publication not only focuses on small offshore fishing boats in the 10-13 m range, but also includes smaller coastal boats. The revision has benefited from recent work regarding the safety of small craft as given below. FAO/SIDA/IMO/BOBP-IGO
  • Thumbnail Image
    Booklet
    Sea safety guide
    A guide for small-scale fishers
    2023
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Fishing the vast Pacific Island waters, small-scale tuna fishers often venture beyond 20 miles of their village shores, to locations with strong oceanic currents, in craft that may not be fit for purpose and with too little in regard to knowledge of their engine or the necessary tools to repair an engine at sea. A craft that outperforms the seas when under power is often overpowered by the sea when the engine fails, with disastrous results and too often loss of life. A sea safety guide for small-scale fishers targets to capture the attention of average fishers to understand how dangerous each and every fishing trip is. And that it is only them that can improve their safety at sea. Simple yet very effective equipment can be easily stowed without conflict to their fishing operation, and should always be carried on every fishing trip. The guide also captures the attention of the boat owners or potential boat owners to understand the various aspects of construction and fit out of a boat, to ensure the boat will be fit for purpose, safer during most operational conditions and can be a reliable life raft for the crew in the advent of capsize or flooding of the boat. The guide is being translated in the languages of the seven FishFAD project countries and targets small-scale fishers with a pictorial guide that should prove easy to understand and relate to the relevance of their own craft within their own fishery.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Project
    Safety at Sea - A Safety Guide for Small Offshore Fishing Boats - BOBP/MAG/16 1993
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Small boats, less than 12 m in length, are not used in most countries to fish offshore for large pelagic species. That was the case in Shri Lanka too, upto around 1980. All the fishing there took place in coastal areas during the day or night and fishing trips never lasted more than 12 hours. That is not true any more. About 400 small decked boats of 9-11 m now venture out as far as 200 n miles from shore and stay at sea for upto ten days in search of tuna, shark and billfish The expansion of the offshore fisheries in Shri Lanka was, in many ways, hurriedly done, without the required upgrading of boat technology for boat and crew safety. These fishermen are still facing new challenges and do not have the experience to prevent breakdowns and, worse, losses at sea. The result is a relatively high accidentrate. Every year, an average of eight boats and around 30 men are lost at sea without trace.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.