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Scaling up the Brazilian School Feeding Model

Using South-South Cooperation to Share Brazil’s Experience of School Feeding in Latin America and the Caribbean








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    Scaling up the Brazilian school feeding model
    Using South-South Cooperation to share Brazil’s experience of school feeding in Latin America and the Caribbean
    2014
    Also available in:

    Brazil has made tremendous progress in reducing malnutrition. In 1990, 14.8 percent of the population suffered from hunger; the figure is now just 1.7 percent. This remarkable transformation owes much to the country’s school feeding programme. By 2014, the programme was supplying approximately 43 million pupils with one or more servings of food per day, in almost 250 000 schools across the country. By Brazilian law, at least 30 percent of the food must be sourced from family farms, thus providin g significant benefits to over 120 000 rural families.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Scaling-up school feeding
    Harnessing what worked for Brazil
    2014
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    Building on the successes of the School Feeding Programme in Brazil, the stage is set to scale-up and further strengthen SFPs, policies and institutions, both within the countries where there is an existing partnership and additional ones. FAO, the Government of Brazil and partner countries are committed to continue this initiative, scaling-up support to 18 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, until 2017.
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    Improving nutrition of school age kids through nutrition-sensitive food system approach
    Near East and North Africa regional network on nutrition-sensitive agri-food - Technical Brief
    2021
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    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) recognises that schools can make an important contribution in countries’ efforts to address food insecurity, poverty and tackle various forms of malnutrition. On top of the potential health, nutrition and education benefits with the latter being measured in terms of net enrolment rate, low dropout rates, better exam scores. Schools are ideal settings for food and nutrition programmes and services, because nutrition and education are closely linked and dietary, hygienic and exercise habits that affect nutritional status are formed during the school-age years. Many eating habits and behavioural patterns are developed during childhood and adolescent period. Schools can also be ideal for reaching large numbers of people, including youth, schools staff, families and communities. Children pass on the information that they received at school about good nutrition to their families and to the wider community. As children are widely perceived to be enthusiastic and able communicators both with their peers, families and wider community, if encouraged and appropriately informed, they can act as agents for change. As such, schools are great entry point for reaching into the community and promoting good nutrition, including proper hygiene and sanitation practices with life-long healthy habits. School food and nutrition interventions can include one or more of the following components: school gardens, school meals, school nutrition standards, school food and nutrition policies, food production linked to school food procurement, nutrition education in the school curriculum and improvements in water and sanitation, as well as other activities that contribute to improvements in school children's health and nutrition. Through all these complementary interventions pupils can improve their diets, develop healthier food practices and extend these to their families and communities.

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