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Building Effective Public-Private Partnerships to Drive Sustainable, Alternative, Non-Traditional Value Chains - TCP/JAM/3703








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    Project
    Sub-Regional Capacity Building in Sustainable Food Systems & Value Chain Development - TCP/SLC/3703 2021
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    According to the Caribbean Community ( a revitalized agricultural sector could play a central role in promoting sustainable rural development and food security in the Caribbean, moving away from an export oriented approach to promote resilience and innovation in the region’s smallholder based agricultural systems In order to tap this potential, individual efforts by single value chain actors would fail to generate the impact required across the region A more holistic and collaborative and integrated approach would on the contrary promote long term sustainable impacts and lead to cost effective, healthy and safe products for all, ensuring the inclusion and integration of smallholder producers, vulnerable consumer groups and rural populations The active participation of the private sector, from farmers and small and medium sized enterprises to multinational food companies, would attract the investments needed to improve productivity, create employment opportunities, reduce food imports and drive industry transformation To achieve these goals, the Governments of Barbados, Belize and Jamaica are committed to developing the agricultural sector by strengthening the performance of agricultural value chains However, the initiatives adopted in this field have often relied on external expertise As a consequence, the three countries requested FAO’s support to improve their institutional capacity to promote inclusive food systems and value chain initiatives strengthen the capacity of ministerial staff to design, implement and evaluate value chain development ( methodologies, stimulate cross departmental collaboration, local ownership, learning, innovation, sustainability and a greater impact on agricultural development The proposed project was therefore aimed at strengthening existing institutional arrangements, the skills of senior management and human resources, collaboration with other departments and the private sector, the training of VCD teams in the skills and methodologies required, and gender empowerment.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Public-Private Partnerships for Agribusines Development 2016
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    High levels of investments are required to unleash the potential of agriculture for sustainable development and poverty reduction in developing countries, but low public budgetary allocations to the sector have slowed growth. To address this problem, innovative partnerships that bring together business, government and civil society actors are increasingly being promoted as a mechanism for pooling much-needed financing while mitigating some of the risks of doing business in the agriculture sector . Commonly referred to as public–private partnerships (PPPs), these initiatives are expected to contribute to the pursuit of sustainable agricultural development that is inclusive of smallholder farmers. However, there remain many unanswered questions about the types of project that may suitably be governed by PPPs and about the partnerships’ effectiveness in delivering on these objectives. To improve understanding of the potential benefits and challenges of agri-PPPs, this publication provides an analysis of 70 PPP cases gathered from 15 developing countries, together with evidence from FAO’s support to the review of PPP policies for agriculture in Southeast Asia and Central America. Four common project types are identified: i) partnerships that aim to develop agricultural value chains; ii) partnerships for joint agricultural research, innovation and technology transfer; iii) partnerships for building and upgrading market infrastructure; and iv) partnerships for the delivery of busine ss development services to farmers and small and medium enterprises. The main lessons are synthesized, including the public skills and institutions required to enable more effective partnerships with the private sector, and the circumstances under which PPPs are likely to be the best modality for achieving sustainable development outcomes. The conclusion reached is that while there is evidence of positive contributions to sustainable agricultural development objectives, there remain several outs tanding issues associated with the impact of PPPs on poverty reduction and inclusion, which still need to be addressed. When deciding whether or not to engage in an agri-PPP, policy-makers should aim to ensure that the partnership will represent value for money and generate public benefits that exceed those that could be achieved through alternative modes of public procurement or through private investment alone.
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    Policy brief
    Small livestock development in Rwanda: enhancing the policy environment for pig and poultry value chains 2023
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    In recent years, much has been accomplished to develop the small livestock subsector in Rwanda. The Livestock Master Plan (LMP) 2017–2022 and the Fourth Strategic Plan for Agricultural Transformation (PSTA 4) 2018–2024 have proposed and attracted investments that have improved productivity of small livestock value chains including better piggery and poultry genetics, feeds and health services. However, this subsector still faces many problems related to policy and the enabling environment. Those problems were identified by a policy analysis involving stakeholder consultations in September and October 2022 and a national policy dialogue held in November 2022, jointly organized by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Ministry of Agricultural and Animal Resources (MINAGRI). The study was supported by the European Union under the FAO-led TAP-AIS project “Developing capacities in agricultural innovation systems: scaling up the Tropical Agriculture Platform Framework”. The main problems facing small livestock development in Rwanda include: - insufficient access to affordable, suitable and nutritious animal feeds; - limited or poor market infrastructure and processing facilities for animal products; - limited extension and animal health services to control disease outbreaks; - financial constraints to smallholder farmers’ participation in different small livestock value chains; - insufficient means of transport and logistics services for live animals and animal products; - limited access to improved animal breeds; and - poor links between small livestock farmers, feed producers and animal processing facilities.

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