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Capacity development in action

Nutrition and trade in Small Island Developing States









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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Global Action Programme on Food Security and Nutrition in Small Island Developing States 2017
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    Although significant diversity exists across Small Island Developing States (SIDS), they share common characteristics that make them uniquely vulnerable to food insecurity, and have contributed to the majority of SIDS facing a “triple burden” of malnutrition in which persistent levels of undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies, coexist with an increasing incidence of overweight and obesity. Responding to the SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway’s call to address these chal lenges, this Global Action Programme on Food Security and Nutrition in Small Island Developing States (GAP) aims to accelerate action on food security and nutrition to support the sustainable development of SIDS. Developed under the leadership of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs and the United Nations Office of the High Representative for the Least Developed Countries, Landlocked Developing Countries and Sma ll Island Developing States, the GAP is intended as a tangible contribution to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Aligned with existing strategies, the GAP provides a framework for SIDS - both as individual nations and as a group – to identify and implement priority actions at global, regional, national and community levels in a coherent, coordinated and collaborative way to achieve their food security and nutrition objectives. Through the GAP, these actions have the potential to signi ficantly improve nutrition and well-being, reduce poverty and inequalities, and foster economic growth in SIDS for present and future generations.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Global Action Programme on Food Security and Nutrition in Small Island Developing States 2017
    Also available in:

    Most Small Island Developing States (SIDS) face a “triple burden” of malnutrition in which persistent levels of undernutrition and micronutrient deficiencies, coexist with an increasing incidence of overweight and obesity. A contribution to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Global Action Programme on Food Security and Nutrition provides a framework for SIDS to identify and implement priority actions to achieve food security and nutrition objectives. These actions can improve nutri tion and well-being, reduce poverty and inequalities, and foster economic growth.
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    Project
    Strengthening the Capacity of Farmers and Food Vendors to Supply Safe Nutritious Food in Guadalcanal, Malaita and Temotu Provinces of Solomon Islands - TCP/SOI/3601 2020
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    With more than 1 000 islands covering a total land area of 28 369 km2 spread over 1.3 million km2, and a population of 515 870 (in 2009), the small island developing state and least developed country of Solomon Islands faces significant food security challenges. As the population grows, there is a need to ensure that food is accessible, affordable and nutritious, providing vital nutrients and proteins to support the health of the population. The increased availability of low-cost imported foods high in carbohydrates and fat is changing dietary patterns in the country. FAO’s 2014 Nutrition in the Pacific Island Countries and Territories states that one third of children under 5 are stunted as a result of failing to meet their daily energy and nutrition requirements. Among adults, nearly 30 percent of women and 25 percent of men are overweight while 14 percent of women and nearly 9 percent of men are obese. The combination of stunted children and overweight adults creates a triple burden of infectious and non-communicable diseases. This Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP) project was formulated to address these food and nutrition-related challenges by building farmer organizations’ capacities to adopt improved agricultural production methods in order to increase root and cash crop production - and the crop’s market competitiveness relative to imports - contributing to their increased availability. Given the country’s increasing youth population, particularly in rural areas, the project placed emphasis on students and young farmers. It also sought to strengthen market linkages between farmer organizations and school canteens in order to improve the nutrition content of school meals. Finally, it assisted school canteens and food vendors in adding value and processing local foods. Its ultimate aim was to increase the consumption of locally grown foods - especially root crops, which are high in micronutrients - to improve food and nutritional security within rural communities. Farmers’ productivity was enhanced through training in community nurseries and demonstration sites in each province. These nurseries also acted as genebanks where farmers from surrounding communities could access improved planting materials. The training curriculum included soil improvement techniques, diversification and intensification of production, pest and disease management, seed production and storage, and post-harvest management. Students were included in the training in line with the project’s focus on youth.

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