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Report on the course on Fishing Vessel Design, Tegal, Indonesia, 12-13 January, 1976








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    Summary report on cruise of the R/V Shoyo Maru in the North Arabian Sea, 2 October 1975 - 14 January 1976 1976
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    As reported in the Fourth Session of the IOFC Executive Committee held in Rome in October 1974, the efforts of IOP in bringing the R/V Shoyo Maru to participate in the North Arabian Sea survey succeeded when the vessel undertook cruises along the waters of Pakistan in November/December 1975. The present paper gives a brief description of the survey and its results, summarized from the original report in Japanese which has been published by the Fishery Agency of Japan in July 1976. The activities covered oceanographic observation, conventional biological survey (sighting of pelagic shoals and collection of fishes) and acoustic survey. A rendez-vous with the R/V Dr. F. Nansen, the main vessel for the North Arabian Sea survey, for calibration of acoustic instruments was a special feature of the survey. The up-welling supposedly to be remnant of the southwest monsoon phenomenon was located at 23°N, 63°E as late as November during the year of survey. Another up-welling noticed in the vicini ty of 24°N, 66°E was interpreted as one inherent to the continental slope. The pelagic shoals appeared rather scarce in the offshore waters covered by the vessel and the demersal fishes were located mainly in the continental slope. The demersal catch included longspine seabream, giant catfish, Jarboua therapon, threadfin breams, brushtooth lizardfish and sweetlips. Indications of substantial stock of squids were noticed in the offshore waters around the up-welling area. The squids appear to sink to deeper layers of 100-350 mt during daytime and move to the upper layer at night and are easily hooked by jigs.
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    Fishing boat designs: 2. V-bottom boats of planked and plywood construction (Rev.2) 2004
    Timber remains the most common material for the construction of boats under 15 metres in length. There has been a change towards fibre-reinforced plastic in most developed countries and some developing countries but, in Africa, Asia and the Pacific, probably more than 90 percent of small fishing vessels are built of wood. The cost advantage of timber versus other materials is still sufficient to ensure that it will remain the dominant boatbuilding material for a long time to come in developing c ountries. However, unrestricted or illicit access to forest resources and the introduction of rational forestry management policies have caused and will continue to cause a scarcity of the sections of timbers traditionally favoured by boatbuilders. The resultant scarcity and high cost of good quality timber have not meant that less wooden boats are being built, but rather that vessel quality has deteriorated through the use of inferior timber and inadequate design strength. This updated and completely revised publication supersedes Revision 1 of FAO Fisheries Technical Paper 134 published in 1997. It follows an exhaustive study on structural timber design applied to wooden boat construction. The publication includes the designs of four small fishing vessels (from 5.2 to 8.5 metres), with comprehensive material specifications and lists, and provides detailed instructions for their construction, both planked and of plywood. The designs are appropriate for inshore and coastal fisheri es and emphasis has been placed on relative ease of construction and minimum wastage of timber.
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    Reconnaissance survey of fishing vessel construction and repair facilities 1971
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    The requirements for the construction and the repair of fishing vessels are not necessarily the same. A repair yard of adequate size may be able to undertake construction, but the reverse is not necessarily true, owing to the need to take boats from the water for repair. Facilities around the Indian Ocean both for construction and repair are many labour, to simple-landing places, where craft are built or repaired on the beach in traditional fashion. In several of the sub-regions described here, construction yards are lacking for modern fishing vessels. In all sub-regions, repair facilities are inadequate for large wooden vessels. In sub-regions where steel vessels now operate, repair service is available in commercial-vessel yards, but it costs more than similar repairs in a fishing-vessel yard. The lack of spare parts for mechanized vessels is a serious problem. The Indian Ocean Programme should consider a solution, perhaps the establishment of central supply depots. A more detailed s tudy of the facilities existing or planned for the Indian Ocean region is needed; it would require at least 18-24 man-months. IOP should promote the inclusion in all major port-development projects of at least class C construction-and-repair facilities for fishing vessels.

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