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Voices from cotton fields

Fighting child labour in Burkina Faso, Mali and Pakistan









FAO. 2023. Voices from cotton fields – Fighting child labour in Burkina Faso, Mali and Pakistan. Rome.



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    The Clear Cotton Project ‘’Eliminating child labour and forced labour in the cotton, textile and garment value chains: an integrated approach’’ is co-funded by the European Union (EU) under the Development Cooperation Instrument and implemented by the International Labour Organization (ILO) in collaboration with FAO. This flyer is part of the communication and visibility strategy of this project, and aims at providing a quick glance about the project scope and main objectives with regard to FAO’s component.
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    Unlocking women’s capacity to become agents of change in the fight to reduce child labour in agriculture in Pakistan
    FAO’s approach under the CLEAR Cotton project
    2022
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    The CLEAR Cotton project: Eliminating child labour and forced labour in the cotton, textile and garment value chains (2018-2023) is co-funded by the European Union and the International Labor Organization (ILO) ). It is implemented by the ILO and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in partnership with the government, employers' and workers' organizations, the private sector, cooperatives, and civil society organizations. This fact sheet presents the areas of intervention implemented as part of the project by FAO in Pakistan as well as their approaches and results with a focus on the lessons learned from empowering women with knowledge, skills and means to start their own businesses. It also presents an overview of the results of ILO-supported interventions as well as lessons learned from the project as a whole.
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    Book (series)
    Can budget support to the cotton sector be used more efficiently? An assessment of the policy support measures in Mali and Burkina Faso. 2015
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    In Burkina Faso and Mali, cotton is the most important cash crop, given its high contribution to the GDP and to the export sector revenue. Export of cotton lint accounted for 60 and 15 percent of the value of national exports, respectively, in 2014. To maintain the level of cotton production, the two Governments support the sector. Indeed, the analysis based on the Monitoring and Analysing Food and Agricultural Policies (MAFAP) methodology show that producers received incentives of 21 and 12 p ercent in Burkina Faso and Mali, respectively, between 2005 and 2012 (Nominal Rate of Protection-NRP). The analysis provides insights on the level of domestic price protection that compensates price distortions resulting from on one hand, exogenous causes namely the international price distortions and the exchange rate misalignment and on the other hand, endogenous inefficiencies such as the high transport or processing costs. Two adjusted NRP are computed, one using an adjusted benchmark price for cotton that is netted out of policy interventions at the international level (Anderson, 2006) and one using an alternate, non-misaligned exchange rate (BCEAO, 2013). The value chain inefficiencies are then discussed, using the Market Development Gap indicator which reveals that higher producer price could be obtained if inefficiencies were corrected through sound investment policies. Finally, a budgetary allocation analysis is proposed, along with the computation of Nominal Rates of Assist ance that reveal the full extent of policy support to the cotton value chain. Price intervention, with other cotton-related budgetary transfers, represented 9 percent of food and agricultural expenditure in Burkina Faso between 2006 and 2012 and 31 percent in Mali.

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