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Bioenergy: A sustainable solution to landscape degradation

XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022










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  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Biofuels and the sustainability challenge
    A global assessment of sustainabilty issues, trends and policies for biofuels and related feedstocks
    2013
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Biofuels global emergence in the last two decades is met with increased concerns over climate change and sustainable development. This report addresses the core issue of biofuel sustainability of biofuels and related feedstocks, drawing from a wide range of sustainability related studies, reports, policy initiatives. The report critically examine the economic, environmental and social sustainability dimensions of biofuels and review the major certification initiatives, schemes and re gulations. In doing so, the report relies on extensive review of a number of country case studies covering a broad range of current biofuel-feedstocks systems. The report analysis clearly distinguish feedstock efficiency (in terms of biofuel yields per unit of land) from sustainability, especially under limiting resource (irrigated water) or sensitive areas (carbon stocks). Also, long run economic viability depend on the future policy support, technical innovations in biofuel systems, economics of biofuel supply and demand and tradeoffs between food and energy uses as well as feedstock productivity gains. Biofuels can present both advantages and risks for environmental sustainability; the latter being often difficult to measure or monitor and may conflict with economic sustainability unless great strides in productivity gains are achieved. Social sustainability is the weakest link in current biofuel certification schemes owing to intrinsic local factors and as eff orts target more few negative social impacts; much less focus is placed on inclusive processes that strengthen marginal stockholders participation and benefits. Biofuel certification schemes need to be more smallholder inclusive, perhaps through policy initiatives. Finally, poor developing countries, especially with abundant land and biomass production potential, need to prioritise food security and poverty reduction. In many cases, biofuel models that encourage small scale integrate d bioenergy systems may offer higher rural development impacts. FDI-induced largerscale biofuel projects, on the other hand, may be suitable in those situations where countries have sufficient industrial capacity, besides land and biomass potential, and when these biofuel projects can be fully integrated into domestic energy strategies that do not conflict with food production potential and food security.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    森林与能源 - 主要问题 2008
    Soaring energy consumption and fossil fuel prices, increasing greenhouse gas emissions and concerns over energy import dependence are driving the search for alternatives to fossil fuels for energy production. Biofuels currently constitute the largest source of renewable energy produced on earth. As biomass, wood offers some of the highest levels of energy and carbon ef?ciency. This publication explores the relationship between forests and energy. It considers the present and future contribution of wood in the production of bioenergy as well as the effects of liquid biofuel crop development on forests. The paper begins with an overview of global energy supply and demand with projections to the year 2030. The contribution of wood energy is then considered in the context of a general discussion of a variety of bioenergy crops and their use in the production of ?rst- and second-generation biofuels. The analysis evaluates the payoffs in developing different sources of bioenergy and the risk s of land conversion. It also discusses market forces and ongoing technological innovations for wood energy production. Policy options and recommendations for bioenergy development are given, stressing the importance of integrated planning and monitoring of land use, and the transfer of advanced wood energy technologies to developing countries. This publication will be useful to both specialized and general audiences interested in learning more about the role of forests in energy production.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Forests and energy 2008
    Soaring energy consumption and fossil fuel prices, increasing greenhouse gas emissions and concerns over energy import dependence are driving the search for alternatives to fossil fuels for energy production. Biofuels currently constitute the largest source of renewable energy produced on earth. As biomass, wood offers some of the highest levels of energy and carbon ef?ciency. This publication explores the relationship between forests and energy. It considers the present and future contribution of wood in the production of bioenergy as well as the effects of liquid biofuel crop development on forests. The paper begins with an overview of global energy supply and demand with projections to the year 2030. The contribution of wood energy is then considered in the context of a general discussion of a variety of bioenergy crops and their use in the production of ?rst- and second-generation biofuels. The analysis evaluates the payoffs in developing different sources of bioenergy and the risk s of land conversion. It also discusses market forces and ongoing technological innovations for wood energy production. Policy options and recommendations for bioenergy development are given, stressing the importance of integrated planning and monitoring of land use, and the transfer of advanced wood energy technologies to developing countries. This publication will be useful to both specialized and general audiences interested in learning more about the role of forests in energy production.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Biofuels and the sustainability challenge
    A global assessment of sustainabilty issues, trends and policies for biofuels and related feedstocks
    2013
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Biofuels global emergence in the last two decades is met with increased concerns over climate change and sustainable development. This report addresses the core issue of biofuel sustainability of biofuels and related feedstocks, drawing from a wide range of sustainability related studies, reports, policy initiatives. The report critically examine the economic, environmental and social sustainability dimensions of biofuels and review the major certification initiatives, schemes and re gulations. In doing so, the report relies on extensive review of a number of country case studies covering a broad range of current biofuel-feedstocks systems. The report analysis clearly distinguish feedstock efficiency (in terms of biofuel yields per unit of land) from sustainability, especially under limiting resource (irrigated water) or sensitive areas (carbon stocks). Also, long run economic viability depend on the future policy support, technical innovations in biofuel systems, economics of biofuel supply and demand and tradeoffs between food and energy uses as well as feedstock productivity gains. Biofuels can present both advantages and risks for environmental sustainability; the latter being often difficult to measure or monitor and may conflict with economic sustainability unless great strides in productivity gains are achieved. Social sustainability is the weakest link in current biofuel certification schemes owing to intrinsic local factors and as eff orts target more few negative social impacts; much less focus is placed on inclusive processes that strengthen marginal stockholders participation and benefits. Biofuel certification schemes need to be more smallholder inclusive, perhaps through policy initiatives. Finally, poor developing countries, especially with abundant land and biomass production potential, need to prioritise food security and poverty reduction. In many cases, biofuel models that encourage small scale integrate d bioenergy systems may offer higher rural development impacts. FDI-induced largerscale biofuel projects, on the other hand, may be suitable in those situations where countries have sufficient industrial capacity, besides land and biomass potential, and when these biofuel projects can be fully integrated into domestic energy strategies that do not conflict with food production potential and food security.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    森林与能源 - 主要问题 2008
    Soaring energy consumption and fossil fuel prices, increasing greenhouse gas emissions and concerns over energy import dependence are driving the search for alternatives to fossil fuels for energy production. Biofuels currently constitute the largest source of renewable energy produced on earth. As biomass, wood offers some of the highest levels of energy and carbon ef?ciency. This publication explores the relationship between forests and energy. It considers the present and future contribution of wood in the production of bioenergy as well as the effects of liquid biofuel crop development on forests. The paper begins with an overview of global energy supply and demand with projections to the year 2030. The contribution of wood energy is then considered in the context of a general discussion of a variety of bioenergy crops and their use in the production of ?rst- and second-generation biofuels. The analysis evaluates the payoffs in developing different sources of bioenergy and the risk s of land conversion. It also discusses market forces and ongoing technological innovations for wood energy production. Policy options and recommendations for bioenergy development are given, stressing the importance of integrated planning and monitoring of land use, and the transfer of advanced wood energy technologies to developing countries. This publication will be useful to both specialized and general audiences interested in learning more about the role of forests in energy production.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Forests and energy 2008
    Soaring energy consumption and fossil fuel prices, increasing greenhouse gas emissions and concerns over energy import dependence are driving the search for alternatives to fossil fuels for energy production. Biofuels currently constitute the largest source of renewable energy produced on earth. As biomass, wood offers some of the highest levels of energy and carbon ef?ciency. This publication explores the relationship between forests and energy. It considers the present and future contribution of wood in the production of bioenergy as well as the effects of liquid biofuel crop development on forests. The paper begins with an overview of global energy supply and demand with projections to the year 2030. The contribution of wood energy is then considered in the context of a general discussion of a variety of bioenergy crops and their use in the production of ?rst- and second-generation biofuels. The analysis evaluates the payoffs in developing different sources of bioenergy and the risk s of land conversion. It also discusses market forces and ongoing technological innovations for wood energy production. Policy options and recommendations for bioenergy development are given, stressing the importance of integrated planning and monitoring of land use, and the transfer of advanced wood energy technologies to developing countries. This publication will be useful to both specialized and general audiences interested in learning more about the role of forests in energy production.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Biofuels and the sustainability challenge
    A global assessment of sustainabilty issues, trends and policies for biofuels and related feedstocks
    2013
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Biofuels global emergence in the last two decades is met with increased concerns over climate change and sustainable development. This report addresses the core issue of biofuel sustainability of biofuels and related feedstocks, drawing from a wide range of sustainability related studies, reports, policy initiatives. The report critically examine the economic, environmental and social sustainability dimensions of biofuels and review the major certification initiatives, schemes and re gulations. In doing so, the report relies on extensive review of a number of country case studies covering a broad range of current biofuel-feedstocks systems. The report analysis clearly distinguish feedstock efficiency (in terms of biofuel yields per unit of land) from sustainability, especially under limiting resource (irrigated water) or sensitive areas (carbon stocks). Also, long run economic viability depend on the future policy support, technical innovations in biofuel systems, economics of biofuel supply and demand and tradeoffs between food and energy uses as well as feedstock productivity gains. Biofuels can present both advantages and risks for environmental sustainability; the latter being often difficult to measure or monitor and may conflict with economic sustainability unless great strides in productivity gains are achieved. Social sustainability is the weakest link in current biofuel certification schemes owing to intrinsic local factors and as eff orts target more few negative social impacts; much less focus is placed on inclusive processes that strengthen marginal stockholders participation and benefits. Biofuel certification schemes need to be more smallholder inclusive, perhaps through policy initiatives. Finally, poor developing countries, especially with abundant land and biomass production potential, need to prioritise food security and poverty reduction. In many cases, biofuel models that encourage small scale integrate d bioenergy systems may offer higher rural development impacts. FDI-induced largerscale biofuel projects, on the other hand, may be suitable in those situations where countries have sufficient industrial capacity, besides land and biomass potential, and when these biofuel projects can be fully integrated into domestic energy strategies that do not conflict with food production potential and food security.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    森林与能源 - 主要问题 2008
    Soaring energy consumption and fossil fuel prices, increasing greenhouse gas emissions and concerns over energy import dependence are driving the search for alternatives to fossil fuels for energy production. Biofuels currently constitute the largest source of renewable energy produced on earth. As biomass, wood offers some of the highest levels of energy and carbon ef?ciency. This publication explores the relationship between forests and energy. It considers the present and future contribution of wood in the production of bioenergy as well as the effects of liquid biofuel crop development on forests. The paper begins with an overview of global energy supply and demand with projections to the year 2030. The contribution of wood energy is then considered in the context of a general discussion of a variety of bioenergy crops and their use in the production of ?rst- and second-generation biofuels. The analysis evaluates the payoffs in developing different sources of bioenergy and the risk s of land conversion. It also discusses market forces and ongoing technological innovations for wood energy production. Policy options and recommendations for bioenergy development are given, stressing the importance of integrated planning and monitoring of land use, and the transfer of advanced wood energy technologies to developing countries. This publication will be useful to both specialized and general audiences interested in learning more about the role of forests in energy production.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Forests and energy 2008
    Soaring energy consumption and fossil fuel prices, increasing greenhouse gas emissions and concerns over energy import dependence are driving the search for alternatives to fossil fuels for energy production. Biofuels currently constitute the largest source of renewable energy produced on earth. As biomass, wood offers some of the highest levels of energy and carbon ef?ciency. This publication explores the relationship between forests and energy. It considers the present and future contribution of wood in the production of bioenergy as well as the effects of liquid biofuel crop development on forests. The paper begins with an overview of global energy supply and demand with projections to the year 2030. The contribution of wood energy is then considered in the context of a general discussion of a variety of bioenergy crops and their use in the production of ?rst- and second-generation biofuels. The analysis evaluates the payoffs in developing different sources of bioenergy and the risk s of land conversion. It also discusses market forces and ongoing technological innovations for wood energy production. Policy options and recommendations for bioenergy development are given, stressing the importance of integrated planning and monitoring of land use, and the transfer of advanced wood energy technologies to developing countries. This publication will be useful to both specialized and general audiences interested in learning more about the role of forests in energy production.

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