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Africa Sustainable Livestock 2050: Awareness of livestock sector policies, laws and One Health among local animal health staff

Snapshot from a survey in six sub-regions in Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda









FAO. 2022. Africa Sustainable Livestock 2050: Awareness of livestock sector policies, laws and One Health in local animal health services – Snapshot from a survey in six sub-regions in Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda. Rome.



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    Policy brief
    Africa Sustainable Livestock 2050: Public resources for animal health services in East Africa
    Evidence from Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda
    2022
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    In the last decade, there has been major progress in designing One Health policies aimed at reducing public health threats along the livestock value chain. Stakeholders in the livestock sector, however, often point out that inadequate finance and human resources limit the capacity of the government to implement the existing One Health policies framework. The extent to which these constraints limit the capacity of the government to deliver services and goods on the ground is however rarely quantified. In this report, we present data on available financial and human resources allocated to animal health services at the central and local level in Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda. We find that the resources allocated by the government on animal health are particularly low in all three countries, with broad negative cost for society. Allocating more resources to prevent, detect and control animal diseases could generate major benefits for society as increase in production of animal source foods and by-products generates income and contributes to food security, while healthier livestock systems improve food safety and reduce significantly public health risks coming from zoonoses.
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    Policy brief
    Animal health services at work in Ethiopia
    Evidence from Ada’a and Sululta districts
    2021
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    Frontline animal health officers, who regularly deal with private sector stakeholders along the livestock value chain, play a fundamental role in supporting enforcement of One Health-related policies, strategies, laws and good practices. However, there's little systematic information on the way they operate on the ground, including on the constraints and challenges they face and the rules and procedures they follow when performing their duties. The FAO and the government of Ethiopia joined forces to fill this information gap and conducted a survey on a complete enumeration basis of fronline animal health officers operating in Ada'a and Sululta Districts. Results of the survey point to both institutional and procedural bottlenecks that prevent animal health officers to efficiently delivery their services on the ground, such as lack of any transport allowance, little knowledge of the existing animal health laws and regulations and unclear rules for career progression. Small investments could often suffice to address many of the identified bottlenecks.
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    Policy brief
    Africa Sustainable Livestock 2050: Livestock biosecurity from a business perspective
    A case study of poultry producers in Egypt, Kenya and Uganda
    2022
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    The growing population, urbanization and increasing incomes will result in an increased demand for animal source food products. To ensure the development of a healthy and productive livestock sector, investments are needed from the public and private sectors. We assess whether poultry producers are in a position to play a role in the development of healthy poultry systems by investing in biosecurity through examples of enterprise budgets of producers from Egypt, Kenya and Uganda. In all three countries, the most important revenue item is sale of broilers (>98 percent of total revenues). The two largest cost items are the purchase of day-old chicks (DOCs) and feed, covering 75 to 92 percent of total costs. Feed is the largest cost item at bigger farms (~5 000 birds per cycle) while purchase of DOCs is the largest cost item at smaller farms (~500 birds per cycle). The observed poultry businesses are profitable, profit margins range from 7 to 56 percent, and annual profits equal 2.3 (Kenya large farm) to 3.5 (Egypt) times the GDP per capita in the countries. Investment in biosecurity can potentially increase profits, however, the impact on profit is very context specific, depending on the different features of the businesses, their exposure to disease risk and market characteristics. We illustrate an example of a small farm in Uganda where profits increased by 10.8 percent after adopting three biosecurity practices.

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