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Evaluation Report of the Links Project - GCP/RAF/338/NOR











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    LinKS Phase II Evaluation Mission Report - GCP/RAF/338/NOR
    Gender, Biodiversity and Local Knowledge to Strengthen Agricultural and Rural Development
    2006
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    The FAO-SDWW project “Gender, Biodiversity and Local Knowledge to Strengthen Agricultural and Rural Development” (GCP/RAF/338/NOR), known as “LinKS,” was a regional project implemented in Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Swaziland from 1998 until January 2006. Phase II of the project (2002-2006), which is the focus of this evaluation, did not include Zimbabwe. Total funding was US$3.7 million, of which $2.2 million was spent in Phase II. The core funding for both phases came from the Governmen t of Norway. Because of start-up delays, Phase II ran for 36 months in Tanzania but only 22 months in Mozambique and Swaziland.
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    DIVERSITY OF EXPERIENCES - understanding change in crop and seed diversity
    A review of selected LinKS studies
    2008
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    The FAO LinKS project (Gender, Biodiversity and Local Knowledge Systems for Food Security in Southern Africa) objective was to improve rural people’s food security and promote the sustainable management of agro-biodiversity by encouraging institutions to recognize farmers’ knowledge in their programmes and policies. The LinKS project, which ended in 2006, was a seven-year regional project implemented in Mozambique, Swaziland, Tanzania and Zimbabwe. One of the main activities of the pro ject was to increase the visibility of men and women’s knowledge of agro-biodiversity management for food security.1 The second phase of the LinKS project included several studies on local seed management, gender roles and local knowledge systems in Mozambique and Tanzania. These projects were in response to the increased recognition of the importance of seed management and seed security for food security. The objective of this report is to place the findings from Mozambique and T anzania into a broader context. Information from a variety of sources was used to identify key aspects that need to be addressed in future seed management interventions. Furthermore, the report aims to provide an analytical framework for decision makers and development practitioners to better understand how seed systems function and to identify ways in which these systems can be supported and strengthened.
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    Junior Farmer Field and Life Schools Inventory 2009
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    The programme was piloted in Mozambique in 2003-2004 and JFFLSchools have been implemented since then in: Cameroon, Ghana, Gaza & West Bank, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, Nepal, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe (foreseen next: Burundi, Congo and Rwanda). Programme evaluations have been undertaken in various countries: Mozambique, Kenya, Uganda and Gaza & West Bank. The JFFLS have been included as one of the main activities in the UNJPs for ‘’youth employment and migratio n’’ in Mozambique and Sudan, as well as in the UNJP for Peace in Nepal. The Junior Farmer Field and Life School approach has a unique learning methodology and curriculum, which combine both agricultural and life skills. The JFFLS approach is an adaptation of successful practices for developing knowledge and life skills among farmers in difficult circumstances such as Farmer Field Schools and Farmer Life Schools, combined with creative and expressive activities rooted in local culture. An innovative aspect of the JFFLS is the way youth are encouraged to develop as people; a school timetable includes cultural activities such as singing, dancing, and theatre. This allows the youth to develop confidence while keeping local cultural traditions alive.

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