Thumbnail Image

Sahel | Regional overview (July 2019)

Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, Mauritania, the Niger and Senegal










Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food Security and Humanitarian Implications in West Africa and the Sahel. N°58 - July/August 2014 2014
    Also available in:

    The areas experiencing a late start of agropastoral campaign, benefitted from a resumption of rainfall since the end of July. However, the Atlantic coast from (i) southern Mauritania to Guinée-Bissau, (ii) northeastern Niger and (iii) northern Ghana, Nigeria and Togo recorded rainfall deficits affecting negatively the agricultural activities. The late start of the rainy season in certain areas (Chad, Mauritania, Niger and Senegal) has extended the agricultural lean season, forcing vulnerable hou seholds to adopt irreversible coping mechanisms if they don’t have access to food assistance. Pastoralists households are already facing the effects of a prolonged lean season. Livestock presents a poor body condition and in some countries of the region loss of animals have been reported (Mali, Niger and Senegal). During the lean season, localized prices increases for millet and sorghum have been observed in Burkina and in Senegal and for millet in Mali. In the eastern commercial basin, price in creases are found in the insecure zones of northern Nigeria as well as in the displaced population sites in southern Chad and in Niger. However, food products availability remains satisfactory and allows a general stability of monthly prices of coarse grains in most of West African markets. In the three West African commercial basins, the commercial flows of agricultural products are in seasonal decrease between June and July 2014 for all cereals, except for millet. Generally, the level of suppl y in local markets remains satisfying in the sub-region, except in conflict-affected areas of northern Mali, of northeastern Nigeria, of C.A.R. and in the neighboring areas. The cross-border trade of countries affected by Ebola in the western commercial basin seems to be affected, as well as trade within the affected countries following quarantine measures taken in some districts. These disturbances have negative socio-economic consequences that might affect the food security of households. As f or now, markets in Nigeria have yet to seem affected by the Ebola outbreak, but the situation is being closely monitored.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Journal, magazine, bulletin
    Food Security and Humanitarian Implications in West Africa and the Sahel. N°53 - February 2014 2014
    Also available in:

    The pastoral lean season will start earlier than usual in some areas in the Sahel region, following pasture dryness and decreasing water levels of watering points. The most affected regions are the ones that experienced rainfall deficits in 2013, most notably in Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal and Chad. The food security situation is starting to deteriorate throughout the region, especially in countries like Senegal and Mauritania, where recent surveys confirm the risk of an early lean season a nd a difficult food security situation for poor households. In West Africa, the three trade basins are currently well supplied with local cereals and prices remained stable or decreased in most markets compared to December 2013. This regional trend in the markets correspond to price decreases in the international markets, particularly for wheat and rice, which are the most imported cereals in the region. In 2014, in line with the Strategic Response Plan for the Sahel region, the food security se ctor aims to support 11.8 million people out of the estimated 20.2 million food insecure people throughout the region. The mobilization of USD 838 million is required to improve the food security situation of the most vulnerable households in the Sahel. Early funding (before April 2014) is required for already food insecure households in order to implement projects that prepare for the main agricultural season as well as the pastoral lean season.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Newsletter
    GIEWS Update West Africa - Sahel, 3 July 2018
    Elevated risk of deterioration in food security in pastoral areas across Sahel and Lake Chad Basin
    2018
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Poor rains in 2017 affected livestock across the pastoral areas of the Sahel. Persisting insecurity hampers access of animals to the grazing areas in northeastern Nigeria, northern Mali and the Lake Chad Region. Large concentrations of livestock in safe areas are resulting in shortages of pasture and depressed prices of livestock products and incomes for pastoralists. Prices of cereals are generally at high levels as demand is reinforced by the return of transhumant pastoralists moving from southern areas to northern normal grazing areas. Livestock prices are at low levels due to declining export demand from Nigeria, resulting in decreasing terms of trade and reducing pastoralists’ access to food. Around 2.5 million pastoralists and agro-pastoralists are food insecure, and a high risk of livelihood losses are expected during the lean season if mitigation actions are not taken. Timely support to pastoralists’ livelihoods is needed to prevent a deterioration of their food security situation and undesirable macro-economic implications.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.