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African swine fever: The medium-term effects on agricultural markets









Schmidhuber, J., Mattey, H., Tripoli, M. and Kamata, A. 2022. African swine fever: the medium-term effects on agricultural markets. FAO, Rome.



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    A risk assessment for the introduction of African swine fever into the Federated States of Micronesia 2022
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    This report describes a risk assessment mission in the Federated States of Micronesia, undertaken by the EpiCentre, School of Veterinary Sciences, Massey University, and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) under FAO Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP/SAP/3801). The overall aim was to evaluate the risk of introducing the African swine fever virus (ASFV) into the Federated States of Micronesia and use the findings to propose recommendations that enable professionals, communities and key stakeholders to implement prevention and mitigation measures to reduce the impacts of African swine fever (ASF) incursion. ASF is a highly contagious viral disease of domestic and wild pigs. It has emerged from Africa, spreading to eastern Europe, China and Southeast Asia. Due to ASF outbreaks in Asia and Papua New Guinea, Pacific Islands countries now prioritise preventing the introduction of ASF. A risk assessment of ASFV introduction is necessary for deciding which preventive actions would be most effective. The assessment of risk was conducted using the OIE import risk analysis framework. The most likely pathway for introducing ASFV into the Federated States of Micronesia was importing unauthorised pork products that international arrival passengers may bring in via airport or searport. Should infected products enter the Federated States of Micronesia, there is a distinct pathway for exposure because pigs are routinely fed food scraps (swill) from households. The likelihood of transmission of ASFV to other susceptible pigs was considered extremely high due to the lack of farm biosecurity and the presence of feral pigs. The assessment method was a systematic, qualitative import risk analysis of ASFV introduction to the Federated States of Micronesia. Results provide information about high-risk areas for ASF introduction, exposure and spread in FSM. They also identify gaps in control and prevention measures. The following steps are being proposed to minimise the likelihood of entry and exposure and the consequence of ASFV introduction.
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    The Global Platform for African swine fever and other important diseases of swine 2014
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    FAO is spearheading an international effort to step up the fight against African swine fever (ASF), a deadly pig disease that can devastate livelihoods and food security. Small-scale farmers are worst hit by the effects of ASF, which also threatens international trade. By developing a Global Platform for African swine fever and other important swine diseases, FAO and its partners plan to increase knowledge on ASF and its ramifications as well as promote collaboration among governments and pig pr oducers to reduce global risk. From 5 to 7 November 2013, experts from Africa, China, Europe, Japan and the United States of America gathered at FAO headquarters to discuss progress on the Global Platform in an effort to better coordinate ASF prevention and control. The Global Platform will bring together the private sector (e.g. pig producers, farmer and veterinarian associations, pharmaceutical companies), international and regional organizations, research institutions, government and non-gove rnmental organizations. The goal will be to shape a common agenda against ASF and other important pig diseases.
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