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Building agricultural resilience to natural hazard-induced disasters

Insights from country case studies










OECD/FAO (2021), Building Agricultural Resilience to Natural Hazard-induced Disasters: Insights from Country Case Studies, OECD Publishing, Paris. https://doi.org/10.1787/49eefdd7-en.



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    Book (stand-alone)
    Building resilience to climate change-related and other disasters in Ethiopia
    Challenges, lessons and the way forward
    2022
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    Ethiopia is exposed to a wide range of disasters associated with the country’s extensive dependence on rainfed subsistence agriculture, climate change, resource degradation, diverse geoclimatic and socio-economic conditions and conflicts. Drought and floods are the major challenges, but a number of other threats affect communities and livelihoods. These include conflict, desert locust, fall armyworm, frost and hail, crop pests and diseases, livestock diseases, human diseases, landslides, earthquakes, and urban and forest fires. Every source of evidence suggests that Ethiopia would feel the human and economic impacts of climate change intensely, and the impacts will only continue to grow if the country continues a business-as-usual approach to crisis response, and will not be able to manage the increasing scale of the challenges. Thus, there is call by all stakeholders for a paradigm shift in the way the country deals with communities at risk, in order to take preventive actions to reduce exposure, vulnerability and impact at local level. This requires moving away from a reactive system that solely focuses on drought and supply of life-saving humanitarian relief and emergency responses during disasters to a comprehensive proactive disaster and climate risk management approach, including climate change adaptation, among which are interventions to enhance livelihood diversification, social protection programmes and risk transfer mechanisms. Furthermore, resilient agrifood systems support should include a range of proven interventions that are context-relevant and cover the whole agrifood system, such as increase in fertilizer use where appropriate and high-yielding and drought-tolerant seeds, strengthened extension and advisory systems at the kebele (local) level through the use of farmer field schools and pastoral field schools, expansion of access to credit, livelihood diversification, risk transfer mechanism and institutional development that link short-term emergency relief to long-term development pathways. This approach is essential for building resilience to natural hazard and human-induced disasters resulting in food insecurity challenges. Much progress has been made in the last 50 years in the way of managing mainly drought disaster risks. Large-scale prevention and mitigation programmes have been designed, incorporating a focus on vulnerabilities, household asset-building, and public works for environmental rehabilitation and generation of livelihoods. Preparedness has been enhanced by the development of various policies and strategic documents for assessment and intervention, early warning and response systems, and economic, social and physical infrastructure to strengthen the local economy and household livelihoods. An attempt has also been made for humanitarian response to count on an established risk-financing.
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    Project
    Building Agricultural Resilience to Natural Disasters - GCP/GLO/986/ITA 2022
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    The adverse impacts of natural hazard induced disasters on agriculture, through damage to facilities and equipment, and production losses in the crops, livestock, forestry, fisheries and aquaculture subsectors, call for the enhanced mainstreaming of disaster risk reduction (DRR) within and across agriculture sectors. There is an urgent need to identify good practices for disaster risk management (DRM), in particular ‘ex ante’ measures, applied by governments, farmers and other stakeholders to increase resilience to natural hazard induced disasters as the increasing frequency and intensity of these types of disasters, and particularly of climate related hazards, are adversely impacting agriculture. Particular attention was given to the issue of agricultural risk management under the Republic of Italy’s G7 Presidency in 2017. In order to make a concrete contribution to this subject, the Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies and Tourism of the Republic of Italy decided to finance a study on building agricultural resilience to natural hazard induced disasters. The current project was the result of that decision.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Building resilience to natural hazards and climate-related disasters in the Caribbean
    Disaster Risk Reduction and Management in Agriculture (DRM) Webinar IV, 26 June 2018. Summary Points, Questions and Answers
    2018
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    While another active and likely severe hurricane season is approaching, different countries in the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region, particularly in the Caribbean, continue to slowly recover from the impacts caused by the catastrophic Irma and Maria events of last year. At the same time, more countries remain highly exposed to natural disasters – of different nature – whose frequency and severity is worsened by the effect of climate change and the limited application of measures for Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) in the region. According to the results of Post-Disaster Needs Assessments (PDNAs) conducted in Dominica and Antigua and Barbuda, the overall amount of damage and losses that occurred in the agriculture sector and sub-sectors (crops, livestock, fisheries and forestry) in these two countries, after the last hurricane season, are: USD 211 million and USD 0.5 million respectively. These figures show how severely natural disasters can affect the economy and food security and nutrition of countries and people largely relying on the agriculture sector and sub-sectors.

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