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Building resilience to natural hazards and climate-related disasters in the Caribbean

Disaster Risk Reduction and Management in Agriculture (DRM) Webinar IV, 26 June 2018. Summary Points, Questions and Answers









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    Policy brief
    Disaster risk management in fisheries
    CC4FISH policy brief: November 2020 - Issue 2
    2021
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    Disasters precipitated by climate change and climate variability are already wreaking havoc in the Caribbean fisheries sector. Examples include hurricanes: Irma 2017 in Barbuda, Maria 2017 in Dominica, Dorian 2019 in The Bahamas. Doing nothing different from current practices will result in increasing damage and critical losses to the fisheries sector. This policy brief highlights the disaster risk management (DRM) cycle for the fisheries sector; summarises ongoing DRM initiatives; presents supporting policy actions for adaptation; and aligns with Sustainable Development Goals, the Small-scale Fisheries Guidelines and the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction.
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    Project
    Improving Agriculture Resilience and Adaptive Capacity to Secure Food and Rural Livelihoods in the Commonwealth of Dominica - TCP/DMI/3703 2022
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    Dominica’s agrifood systems are severely impacted by climate change Not only do sea level rises, with saltwater intrusion and inconsistent rain patterns disrupting agriculture production, but the small island is also affected by large scale natural disasters, such as hurricanes, floods and tropical storms, which have a lasting effect on the population and the country’s economic resources These calamities are expected to increase in frequency and magnitude, representing significant socio economic risks for the sustainable development of the Caribbean’s islands In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in 2017 which damaged or destroyed 90 percent of crops, climate resilience became a cross sectoral priority on Dominica’s political agenda In this framework, the sustainable management of natural resources, effective institutional coordination and a comprehensive understanding of the conceptual and technological resources available are critical to countering climate vulnerability and food insecurity To adapt to this new complex situation, the Government of Dominica has identified the agriculture sector as a critical domain to guarantee the livelihoods and food security of the population, especially those of vulnerable small farmers, fishers and rural communities The sector accounts for 25 percent of the country’s employment, making it a major contributor to Dominica’s economy.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Addressing Disaster Risk Management in Caribbean Agriculture 2015
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    Natural disasters such as drought, hurricanes, earthquakes and floods have had devastating impacts on Caribbean economies and livelihoods over the last decade. The active hurricane season of 2004 resulted in damages in the Caribbean amounting to USD 3.1 billion1, with catastrophic impacts on the gross domestic product (GDP) of member countries, particularly in Grenada (estimated at 200 percent of GDP2). These shocks have serious macroeconomic effects which have increased the incidence of poverty and which could even lead to economic crises in the country. The Agriculture Sector in particular, has been severely affected, by these weatherrelated and seismic events. Consequently, the region’s food and nutrition security has been impacted. These impacts include, inter alia, loss of crops and livestock, reduced agricultural productivity, malnutrition, forest fires, destruction of housing for livestock, increased migration of fish from the region, high food prices and loss of livelihoods of affected farmers and fisherfolk.

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