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Public employment programmes in the time of COVID-19











 FAO. 2020. Public employment programmes in the time of COVID-19. Rome. 



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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Food safety guidelines: Keeping workers safe along the food supply chain in acutely food insecure contexts
    Webinar – 30 June 2021: Summary points, questions and answers
    2021
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    Keeping food and food workers safe is even more complex during a global pandemic crisis and all stakeholders must contribute to maintaining 360 degree oversight of every aspect of the food supply chain. Workers in the food supply chain play an indispensable role in sustaining the movement of food along the supply chain. Therefore, keeping workers, production facilities, transport infrastructure and all other areas in the supply chain safe, is critical for mitigating the impacts of this unprecedented COVID-19 crisis. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), in a longstanding partnership with the World Health Organization (WHO), is involved in a range of initiatives to support global food safety and protect the health of both consumers and workers. As part of the comprehensive COVID-19 response and recovery programme, FAO and its partners are working to prevent the pandemic from disrupting food systems. While COVID-19 is not transmitted by food products, disruptions precipitated by the primary and secondary effects of the pandemic have put food supplies at risk all over the world, while simultaneously raising awareness on food safety-related issues. Concerted efforts on the food supply chain and more specifically the health and safety of workers, will help the most food insecure countries mitigate the socio-economic impacts of the pandemic and boost resilience for the long term by facilitating food and agricultural trade, preventing the spreading of any future zoonotic pandemic and helping the transition of the food systems towards sustainability. FAO, in the publication "Food safety in the time of COVID-19", provides sound principles of environmental sanitation, personal hygiene and established food safety practices to reduce the likelihood that harmful pathogens will threaten the safety of the food supply. Additionally, component IV of FAO’s COVID-19 Global Humanitarian Response Plan is supporting awareness raising and sensitization campaigns among food workers at all levels. Against this background, the webinar aimed at bringing together an array of diverse partners and experts to discuss issues surrounding occupational health and safety risks along the food supply chain. The discussion focused on food safety guidelines as well as the experiences and learnings from different contexts among the most acutely food insecure countries.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Palestine | Revised humanitarian response (May–December 2020)
    Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
    2020
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    The humanitarian situation in Palestine is characterized by persistent restrictions on access to natural resources, as well as on the movement of goods and people. This is exacerbated by natural and environmental hazards, such as winter storms, and the longer-term effects of climate change. The protracted crisis poses a range of protection strains on the livelihoods of Palestinians, including the destruction of productive assets and lack of access to essential inputs, services and livelihood opportunities. After the first cases of COVID-19 were confirmed in Bethlehem city on 5 March, the Palestinian Prime Minister declared a state of emergency across Palestine and imposed a lockdown that was eased on 25 May 2020. On 2 July 2020, the West Bank returned to a complete lockdown following a record number of new infections. The pandemic is currently causing a major negative shock to Palestinian socioeconomic development, putting public welfare, employment and livelihoods at risk, threatening a further deterioration in poverty and food insecurity levels, social cohesion, and financial and fiscal stability. Specifically, in addition to the public health and humanitarian implications of COVID-19, the essential health-related measures restricting the movement of people, and the associated economic slowdown, negatively affect poor and vulnerable populations that were already facing a protracted conflict/insecurity condition. In the framework of FAO’s Corporate COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme and the United Nations Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19, FAO has revised its humanitarian response for 2020 to mitigate the effects of the pandemic and address the needs of the most vulnerable households.
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    Meeting
    State of food and agriculture in the Asia and Pacific region, in light of the COVID-19 pandemic
    Thirty-sixth Session of the FAO Regional Conference for Asia and the Pacific (APRC 36)
    2022
    FAO has been intensively working on the COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme, to reach a larger share of rural populations and to relaunch economic activities. In addition to response, the Programme is also working on building back better and stronger towards transforming agrifood systems across all our Four Betters, with an emphasis on its seven priority areas of work as well as focus on science and innovation, climate change, legal frameworks and scaling up existing programmes. This paper examines the situation in Asia and the Pacific during the COVID-19 pandemic situation in 2020 and 2021. It reviews the health, economic, livelihood, and food security impacts both regionally and at the country level for specific groups such as the poor and the most vulnerable segments of the population. Given the broad socio-economic reach of the pandemic, the Report examines the macro-economic impacts and the effects on employment and income, migration and trade, economic growth and government fiscal space, food security and nutrition, poverty, and hunger. The Report also reviews the various government responses to the COVID-19 pandemic covering the health crisis, macro economy, unemployment, food supply disruptions, food demand shocks arising from the pandemic lockdowns, reduced mobility, restrictions on international travel, and internal and cross border migration. These responses include government investments in health services; expansion of social protection measures to new groups and beneficiaries; measures to ensure continued trade in critical food and health products, and financial support measures to minimize job losses and reduce food supply chain disruptions. It also covers new policies and investment priorities, including digital technologies, to rebuild agrifood systems that are resilient, inclusive and green.

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