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SAFETY AT SEA FOR SMALL-SCALE FISHERIES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES - SAFETY FOR FISHERMEN: THE WAY FORWARD







SAFETY AT SEA FOR SMALL-SCALE FISHERIES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES - SAFETY FOR FISHERMEN: THE WAY FORWARD, FAO, 2010, Pages 83.


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    Safety at Sea - Safety Guide for Small Fishing Boats- BOBP/REP/112 2009
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    Fishing is a very dangerous occupation with a high accident risk. Experience has shown that it is often when a fishery develops from traditional sail-powered craft and near shore fishing to motorized craft venturing further out to sea and with new fishing methods that accidents happen. In many developing countries, fibreglass reinforced plastic (FRP) boats are replacing traditional wooden boats and this new construction material requires new thinking when it comes to strength, stability and the ability to keep afloat when swamped. It is often difficult to do something about boats already in operation, but significant safety measures can be incorporated at relatively low cost in boats yet to be built. Close cooperation between the government departments responsible for safety legislation and the boatyards is required. The purpose of this safety guide is to present simple measures to ensure that new boats will satisfy internationally accepted safety standards. The target group c onsists of boat designers, boatbuilders, boat owners, skippers and government officials responsible for drafting new regulations and for safety supervision. This safety guide is not intended to be comprehensive and deal with all kinds of safety issues, but it will highlight the main problems and indicate what practical measures can be taken to avoid them. The guide mainly deals with small boats of less than 15min length, which, from experience are most prone to accidents. The Food and Agricu lture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO) are working together to draft new safety recommendations for decked fishing boats of less than 12 m and undecked fishing boats of any length. This work is expected to be finalized by 2010. The present guide is a revision of BOBP/MAG/16: A safety guide for small offshore fishing vessels issued by the Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP) in 1993. The main chang e is that this publication not only focuses on small offshore fishing boats in the 10-13 m range, but also includes smaller coastal boats. The revision has benefited from recent work regarding the safety of small craft as given below. FAO/SIDA/IMO/BOBP-IGO
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    Credit For Fisherfolk : The Experience In Adirampattinam Tamil Nadu, India - BOBP/WP/38 1986
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    One of the prime needs of small-scale fisherfolk is credit. Under a “coastal village development project” initiated by the BOBP in Adirampattinam, Tamil Nadu, India, in 1981, the credit needs of fisherfolk were determined and a scheme was formulated under which a nationalised bank would lend Rs. 1,000 each to 100 fishermen for the purchase of nets. Fish marketing loans were given to fisher-women by a voluntary organization, the Working Women’s Forum (WWF) and also by the Fisherwomen’s Extension Service of the Fisheries Department. The project and its activities have been described in an earlier paper (BOBP/WP/1 9 — “Coastal village development in four fishing communities of Adirampattinam, Tamil Nadu, India” by F. W. Blase). The present paper evaluates the impact of the loans for fisherfolk (both project loans for fishermen and those provided for fisherwomen by the WWF and the Fisheries Department.) The paper studies the usefulness of the loans and the rate of loan repayment. It at tempts to analyse the success of the strategy of “group formation” for loan distribution and for development. The Coastal Village Development Project and the loan evaluation study which is the subject of this report are activities of “Development of Small-Scale Fisheries in the Bay of Bengal,” a project of the BOBP. It started in 1979. It is funded by SIDA (Swedish International Development Authority) and executed by FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations). Its main goal s are to develop, demonstrate and promote appropriate technologies and methodologies to improve the conditions of small-scale fisherfolk in member countries — Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, Sri Lanka and Thailand.
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    Pen Culture Of Shrimp In The Backwaters Of Killai, Tamil Nadu - BOBP/WP/32
    A Study Of Techno-Economic And Social Feasibility
    1985
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    This report describes the findings and recommendation of a technoeconomic and social feasibility study of shrimp pen culture in the backwaters of Killai, Tamil Nadu. It is based on field surveys in the communities of the region in the latter half of 1983 and on three culture trials at Killai undertaken during an earlier 21-month technical programme conducted by BOBP and the Department of Fisheries, Government of Tamil Nadu. The 21-month progranime showed promise of technical viability on pen culture of shrimp. This study was therefore undertaken to focus on problems relating to social and economic feasibility, and thus help plan future state policy on introducing shrimp pen culture to fisherfolk. The study and the paper resulting from it are activities of the smallscale fisheries project of the Bay of Bengal Programme (BOBP). The project is funded by SIDA (Swedish International Development Authority) and executed by FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nat ions), and covers five countries bordering the Bay of Bengal — Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, Sri Lanka and Thailand. The main goals of the project are to develop, demonstrate and promote appropriate technologies and methodologies to improve the conditions of small-scale fisherfolk and to boost supplies of fish from the small sector in member countries. The author of the paper would like to thank Dr. lan R. Smith (Deputy Director-General, ICLARM, Manila), Mr. I. Rajendran and Mr. V.C. Bose (D irectorate of Fisheries, Government of Tamil Nadu), and Dr. M. Karim (BOBP) for their cooperation in the planning and execution of this study.

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