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FAO - Nutrition country profiles: Vanuatu 2003








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    Book (stand-alone)
    Let's Go Local - Guidelines for Promoting Pacific Island Food 2011
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    Over the past decades, food and dietary patterns in Pacific Island Countries have undergone significant changes. Traditional diets consisting of fresh fish, root crops, breadfruit and local fruits and vegetables have been increasingly replaced by imported, often highly processed foods such as white rice, flour, instant noodles, canned foods, fatty low grade meats and soft drinks with a high sugar content. At the same time, a more sedentary lifestyle is becoming common among many Pacific Islander s As a result, Pacific Island Countries now face a wave of dietary and lifestyle-related health problems. Chronic non-communicable diseases including diabetes, heart disease and cancer are now the main causes of death, illness and disability among adults in the Pacific Island Countries. Furthermore, countries are burdened by micro-nutrient deficiencies related to a lack of essential vitamins and minerals in the diet, such as vitamin A deficiency and anaemia. There is evidence that the tradit ional diet, lifestyles and food systems of the Pacific protected people in the past against these health problems. Food composition data provides scientific evidence of the rich nutrient content and health benefits of the traditional foods, including breadfruit, banana, taro, yam, cassava and sweet potato, as well as coconut, fish and seafood, and various fruits and vegetables.
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    Project
    Improving Diets and Nutrition Outcomes in Southern Africa - TCP/SFS/3604 2020
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    It is widely acknowledged that having a high-quality diet is one of the single most important contributors to nutrition outcomes and health, while poor-quality diets result in malnutrition in its many forms, including under-nutrition, micronutrient deficiencies and obesity. In recent years, African countries have begun to undergo a dietary transition, marked by changes in food consumption patterns. Globalization, urbanization and changes in the food supply and lifestyles have resulted in a shift in dietary habits, a loss in dietary diversity and a loss of traditional food cultures. Shifts to sub-optimal diets are compounded by a lack of awareness of nutrition and a low level of empowerment to make healthy food choices. The general population has been exposed to mixed and misguided nutrition messages which, in turn, negatively influence their overall knowledge, outlook and behaviour towards making healthy food choices. These changes, coupled with the increased availability and marketing of products of low nutritional value, highlighted the need for consistent, simple and practical dietary guidance to enable people to make healthy food choices and therefore prevent negative health outcomes, and to assist countries in developing food, health and agriculture policy. The Sub-regional Office of Southern Africa (SFS) therefore implemented this project, TCP/SFS/3604, to support three countries (Seychelles, the United Republic of Tanzania, and Zambia) in promoting healthy diets through the development of Food-based Dietary Guidelines (FBDGs). This TCP also supported the Government of Lesotho in the development of a Nutrition and Home Economics Strategy (NHES) for the Department of Nutrition and Home Economics (DoNHE) in the Ministry of Agriculture. The FBDGs are evidence-based recommendations with a series of harmonized nutrition messages and related illustrations that represent what a healthy diet is. The guidelines also provide advice on foods, food groups and dietary patterns to help the population meet nutrition requirements, so as to promote overall health and prevent diet-related non-communicable diseases. The FBDGs are intended to establish a basis for policies on food and nutrition, public health, and agriculture, as well as nutrition education programmes, in order to foster healthy eating habits and lifestyles.
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    Document
    SIDS solutions innovations profile. Food processing: Improving local value chains (Samoa)
    SIDS Solutions Forum, 30-31 August 2021
    2021
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    As part of the SIDS Solutions Forum, 30-31 August 2021, FAO collected innovations and creative digital technologies that respond to local problems and challenges. Many Pacific Islands rely on imported foods, which often negatively impact the health and nutrition of the local population and which increase the occurence of obesity, diabetes and other non-communicable diseases. This flyer describes the production of flour from breadfruit, banana, taro and cassava, that can be consumed locally or exported. The producers are exploring possibilities to use the waste from food processing to make coconut wood and produce energy. The initiative is supporting sustainable livelihoods for farmers who had lost their incomes due to the COVID-19 crisis.

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