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Peatland Restoration and Sustainable Grazing in Brandenburg

Brandenburg, Germany (52°09’53.27“N,13°35’10.09“E)








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    Rewetting Alkaline Fens in Brandenburg
    Brandenburg, Germany (51°28’02.74“N, 13°57’57.51“E)
    2015
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    From 2010–2015, Naturschutzfonds Brandenburg is implementing the LIFE Nature Project ‘Alkaline Fens in Brandenburg’. Through this project, Naturschutzfonds Brandenburg manages conservation activities intended to safeguard and develop large alkaline fens in fourteen Natura–2000 areas in the federal state of Brandenburg in Germany.
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    Peatland Restoration and Sustainable Grazing in China
    Ruoergai Plateau, China, Asia (32.20–34.10° N,102.15°–103.50° E)
    2015
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    Situated at the headwaters of the Yellow River, the sedge-dominated peatlands in the Ruoergai plateau in China, store water and supply it to downstream areas. These peatlands also support endemic and endangered Himalayan species and maintain the special aspects of Tibetan culture. In the 1960-70’s, the Ruoergai peatlands, which had been drained for agriculture, began to be badly damaged by overgrazing. Assessments and field observations indicate that over 70 percent of the peatlands are severely degraded. As a result, a large amount of CO2 stored in the peat has been released to the atmosphere and biodiversity has been lost. All of these environmental consequences have had an impact on local livelihoods.
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    Rewetting Drained Forest in Southern Sweden
    Sweden, Jönköping County (57°65’N, 13°72’E)
    2015
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    In the early 1970’s, about 80 ha of rich fen, meadows and wet forest on the margins of the large and pristine raised bog ‘Komosse’ in Southern Sweden were drained by ditches to promote spruce (Picea abies) growth and forestry production. Draining had a dramatic impact on forest production on the nutrient-rich peaty soils downhill from the ditches. In 40 years, most of the meadows and fens had turned into dense forest. Because of the high nature conservation value (mainly birdlife) of the bog, th e entire area (including surrounding forests) was later designated a Ramsar site, a nature reserve, and a Natura 2000 area.

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