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Beyond “temporal” resilience: results that withstand the test of time











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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
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    Document
    Nutritional Deficiencies as Driver for Agriculture Value Chain Development: Lessons from the Field 2013
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    The search for effective ways to link agricultural resources to resolve nutritional problems has been an on and off challenge for more than 4 decades. Despite the impressive surge in effort over the past few years the fact remains genuine integration at all levels is very challenging. Why? If our collective challenge is to solve specific diet-related deficiencies, effectively communicating that challenge is the clear starting point so that barriers to change are broken and awareness and demand f or change is created. If approached in this way it comes down to a demand/ supply challenge. My straight forward approach to managing field projects has followed this simple point. Starting with the specific maternal/child nutritional gap and/or illness in zone of influence the staff explored how that problem (demand) could actually be addressed when viewed as a driver for agricultural supply chain upgrading. In other words, diet-related problems like the underconsumption of certain foods contai ning micronutrients (e.g. iron or carotene); diseases (e.g. diarrhea) or food safety issues (e.g. aflotoxin) can be prompts for adding value to crops that can in turn contribute to the solution. This represents a counter-intuitive response to most of status quo thinking about “nutrition” interventions. When viewed this way the key interventions from the technical support areas comprising agriculture, nutrition, health, business and cross-cut areas including gender and environmental resilience be come contextual, strategic and clear for all. Nexus points are identified, messages are designed jointly and are mutually enforcing. Field activities are no longer implemented in isolation and at cross purposes. This paper presents actual field experiences where using nutrition as the driver for all sizes of agricultural value chain activities does result in lasting change. The policy implications of this approach are also discussed.
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    Policy brief
    NENA Regional Network on Nutrition-Sensitive Food System – Policy Brief
    Building resilience and protecting diets in fragile and conflict-affected contexts
    2021
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    Crises, including those caused by conflict, disrupt regular community practices and essential services. Populations are often displaced, while food production, storage, processing, distribution and consumption can be significantly impacted. Likewise, caring and feeding for infants and young children can be disturbed, along with sanitary and healthy conditions. Malnutrition and hunger rates thus tend to raise and large amounts of people might lack the possibility to fulfil basic and immediate human needs, such as water and food. In crisis, the most affected ones tend to be infant and young children, pregnant and lactating mothers, elderly and disabled people. It is essential for emergency response and humanitarian aid to protect lives, restore livelihoods and rehabilitate food systems as fast as possible. During this period, it is also important to protect infant and young child feeding, and ensure meals for pregnant and lactating mothers are in sufficient quantity quality, safety and diversity. It is also important that elderly and disabled people received adequate support. It is important to ensure that humanitarian assistance and resilience operations adequately monitor the hunger and nutrition situation in order to prepare for, prevent and respond to degradations. Response should consider the needs of the most vulnerable groups such as women, children, elderly and disabled people. The well-targeted assistance with appropriate information and indicators can help reducing deterioration of nutritional status of vulnerable groups. Therefore, related assessments for should consider integrating nutrition information to determine the nutritional situation and develop better-targeted support. Assessment of the nutritional needs of different age groups; monitoring of the adequacy of dietary intake before, during and after the emergency; evaluation of the changes in food habits and practices, including coping strategies, are thus paramount. During emergencies, many children are admitted to specialized treatment centres (Therapeutic and Supplementary Feeding Centres) due to the acute and severe nutrition situation and receive life-saving support. Knowledge of nutritional requirements and proper feeding and caring practices is essential for the recovery of these children. However, families and caregivers often face difficulties in caring for children after the discharge due to the lack of knowledge on how to feed and care for children during humanitarian emergencies. Therefore, resilience and emergency response operations can add value by integrating nutrition education and improved feeding and caring practices for infant and young children as part of the interventions. The emergency operations that primarily look at the distribution of agriculture inputs (i.e. seeds, fertilizers,

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