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Piloting the Demonstration of the National Livestock Development Transformation Plan in Selected States - TCP/NIR/3701








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    Emergency Support to the Libyan Veterinary Services for Combatting Major Zoonotic and Transboundary Animal Diseases - TCP/LIB/3701 2022
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    Production systems in Libya are characterized by the coexistence of intensive farming systems (poultry and dairy) and extensive farming systems (small ruminants and camels) Uncontrolled cross border livestock movements and transhumance present a risk for the entry and spread of transboundary animal diseases ( and zoonoses Transboundary animal diseases such as foot and mouth disease ( P este des petits ruminants ( sheep and goat pox, Newcastle disease and zoonoses such as highly pathogenic avian influenza ( Rift Valley fever ( and brucellosis are the main constraints to livestock production and development, and can cause serious human health issues The incidence of animal diseases is reportedly increasing, and diseases that could have a significant economic impact and main zoonoses could become endemic.
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    Piloting the Climate-Smart Approach in the Livestock Production Systems - TCP/MON/3703 2022
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    In Mongolia, the agriculture sector contributed 13 3 percent of gross domestic product ( in 2017 the second largest sector following the mining sector The contribution of the livestock sector to the agriculture GDP was 88 percent Approximately 40 percent of the work force directly depends on the livestock sector and the sector is dominated by an extensive livestock production system dependent on access to grasslands and thus inherently vulnerable to climatic and natural resource management risks and climate change It has been estimated that average annual temperature in Mongolia increased two fold between 1940 and 2013 around three times the global average Climate change has a negative impact on animal productivity, animal health, biodiversity, the quality and amount of feed supply, and the carrying capacity of pastures It has also led to the outbreak of new and re emerging livestock diseases, and a change in disease patterns The absence of policy or market based mechanisms to control livestock numbers and a lack of awareness regarding rangeland degradation has led to increasing herd sizes, producing acute limitations of forage and increasing desertification In 2020 76 9 percent of Mongolia's territory was affected by desertification Permanent pastures and meadows occupy about 110 5 million ha 71 8 percent of the total territory of Mongolia) 65 percent of this pastureland is already degraded to some extent.
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    Improving the Implementation of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Standards and Norms for Animal and Plant Health in Sudan - TCP/SUD/3606 2020
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    It has been estimated that the animal sector in Sudan supports approximately 30 percent of the country‘s human population, contributing around 20 percent to national gross domestic product (GDP) and 47 percent to agricultural GDP. According to recent estimates, the country has about 30 million heads of cattle, 40 million heads of sheep and 30 million heads of goats, as well as around 4.5 million camels, largely owned by pastoralists. Small ruminants account for 30 percent of the livestock units of the country and contribute significantly to the national economy. The animal sector is affected by various transboundary animal diseases (TADs) that have a negative impact on livestock trading. Among the most important of these are foot and mouth disease (FMD), Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), brucellosis, Rift Valley fever (RVF) contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) and bluetongue (BT). As a member of the World Animal Health Organization (OIE), Sudan has taken important steps towards controlling FMD and PPR. The country currently exports livestock (mainly small ruminants and camels) to Saudi Arabia and chilled sheep meat to Jordan. However, exports are often impeded by outbreaks of one of the TADs listed above. This has a serious impact on livestock trading in Sudan, owing to the lack of an early warning system and poor skills in outbreak investigation. In addition, risk-based strategic plans and contingency plans for important TADs in Sudan do not exist. The main objective of this project was to support MOAF and MOAR to strengthen their technical capacities in issues related to animal health, phytosanitary and food safety and quality control (QC) to bring them into line with the relevant international standards and guidelines, and to develop appropriate responsive policies and regulatory frameworks.

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