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FAO in the 2021 humanitarian appeals

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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    FAO in the 2022 humanitarian appeals 2021
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    The world has not faced a risk of widespread famine affecting multiple countries so severe in over a decade. In four countries, 584 000 people are living in famine conditions. Elsewhere, an additional 45 million are at a tipping point. Intensifying and spreading conflicts, climate extremes and the continued effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic have pushed more and more people to the brink. Despite this, the agriculture component of the 2021 humanitarian appeals was massively underfunded. Major seasons have passed and with those, a vital opportunity to secure a steady livelihood. Growing numbers of people are forced to rely on food assistance for seemingly endless periods. It is time to take agriculture seriously. Agriculture is among the most cost‑effective humanitarian frontline interventions. Emergency livelihoods assistance responds to immediate hunger needs – ensuring nutritious food is produced right where it is needed most – and provides a path out of protracted and deepening food crises. While food assistance provided after the worst-case scenario materializes is critical, if we don’t start giving equal priority to investments aimed at rebooting local agricultural production to save lives and making agriculture in vulnerable countries more resilient, 2022 will look just like 2021 – or worse.
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    Booklet
    Drought in the Horn of Africa – Rapid response and mitigation plan to avert a humanitarian catastrophe
    January–June 2022
    2022
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    The Horn of Africa is facing the third severe La Niña‑induced drought episode in a decade, and the region is on the verge of a catastrophe if humanitarian assistance is not urgently scaled up. Drought is particularly impacting Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia and exacerbating the humanitarian situation in a region characterized by underlying vulnerabilities and already suffering from the impact of multiple shocks since late 2019. These include a desert locust upsurge (the first in 70 years), the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‑19) pandemic and its socioeconomic implications, abnormally high food prices, and protracted conflict and insecurity. Drought is among the most devastating of natural hazards – crippling food production, depleting pastures, disrupting markets, and, at its most extreme, causing widespread human and animal deaths. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) rapid response and mitigation plan for the Horn of Africa describe the set of activities that should be prioritized from the recent Humanitarian Response Plans (HRPs) for Ethiopia and Somalia, as well as those included in the Kenya Drought Flash Appeal, in order to save the livelihoods and therefore the lives of 1.5 million rural people across the three countries. The timeframe for the plan is January to June 2022 (six months). FAO is urgently requesting USD 129.9 million to provide critical assistance to rural populations, prevent the further worsening of hunger and malnutrition, safeguard livelihoods, as well as prevent displacement and further increases in humanitarian needs in 2022.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Addressing the impacts of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in food crises (April–December 2020)
    FAO’s component of the Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID-19 (July update)
    2020
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    The world is standing on the precipice of the greatest food crisis in generations. Worldwide, people and their communities are reeling from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, which extend far beyond the direct health impacts. Food systems have been disrupted, informal employment all but stopped for millions, markets have closed and remittances have dried up and the most vulnerable have found themselves struggling to access sufficient food. Increasingly, as smallholders are unable to access the critical inputs they need to continue producing, food availability is emerging as a major concern. Conflict, weather extremes and pre-existing economic turbulence continue to push more people into acute hunger, exacerbated by the reverberations of the pandemic. The worst-case scenario of famine is inching closer to reality for millions of girls, boys, women and men, especially for the 27 million people that were already experiencing emergency levels of acute hunger before the pandemic. Responding to these challenges requires urgent action at scale. Critical agricultural seasons, livestock movements for pasture and water, food harvesting, processing and storage – these are not activities that can be put on hold as we tackle the health impacts of the pandemic. Without support, increasing numbers of people will be forced to abandon their livelihoods and rely on much more costly food assistance to survive. Anticipatory action now is not just more cost effective than waiting to rebuild livelihoods and communities later, it is more humane and respectful of the dignity of the billions of people relying on some form of agriculture for their livelihoods. This is at the heart of FAO’s response to the indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. FAO’s programme focuses on four key components to save lives and livelihoods threatened by the pandemic, as follows: (i) rolling out data collection and analysis; (ii) ensuring availability of and stabilizing access to food for the most acutely food-insecure populations; (iii) ensuring continuity of the critical food supply chain for the most vulnerable populations; and (iv) ensuring food supply chain actors are not at risk of virus transmission.

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