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Prudent and efficient use of antimicrobials in pigs and poultry

A practical manual












Magnusson, U., Sternberg, S., Eklund, G., Rozstalnyy, A. 2019. Prudent and efficient use of antimicrobials in pigs and poultry. FAO Animal Production and Health Manual No. 23. Rome. FAO. 




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    Handbook Responsible use of antibiotics in livestock production for animal health workers in Viet Nam 2020
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    Using antimicrobial drugs in terrestrial and aquatic animals is critical to both health and productivity. It contributes to food safety and animal wellbeing, and in turn to protecting the livelihood and sustainability of animal production. There is a growing concern that resistance to antimicrobial drugs, including antibiotics, will reverse the achievements of food safety and animal health. It is important that these drugs remain available and effective in animal health and agriculture. Animal health workers play a role in veterinary extension and livestock production services. He or she provides preventive animal health care, help in animal disease control, biosecurity promotion, and basic first aid services to farm animals, however many of them do not have neither practical guidelines nor access to training on antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial use. The Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases, FAO Viet Nam, has provided various training programmes to animal health workers, in collaboration with the Department of Animal Health. Our experience has shown that animal health workers are a part of the solutions for responsible antimicrobial use and mitigation of antimicrobial resistance. This handbook, therefore, aims to provide first-hand knowledge on antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial use, serving as a practical guideline for animal health workers to gain a better understanding and advocate them to promote responsible antimicrobial use among animal producers and animal drug sellers and ultimately reduce antimicrobial resistance.
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    Booklet
    Guidelines for antimicrobial use in poultry and livestock sectors in Egypt 2024
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    The misuse of antimicrobials in the veterinary sector is serious because it has a triple effect on the spread of antibiotic resistance in humans. The first is through the direct transmission of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from animals to humans, the second is through potential antimicrobial residues in food of animal origin, which may enable bacteria within bodies of humans to develop resistance to antimicrobials, and the third effect occurs due to the dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from animals in the environment. In Egypt, improvement of livestock and poultry productions are very important to increase the animal protein amount available for each person per year. Animal production in Egypt is variable ranges from household breeding of few numbers of animals or birds, or pastoral continuously mobile flocks consisting of tens to hundreds of animals to big and organized farms consisting of thousands of animals. These national guidelines for AMU aims to enlighten the whole community in Egypt, particularly livestock–poultry producers, about the appropriate use of antimicrobials. This is to enhance knowledge of producers for reducing antimicrobial resistance rates, avoid other negative health effects of antimicrobial residues in foods of animal origin, and to enhance safe and profitable animal production.
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    Newsletter
    FAO Viet Nam Newsletter - H7N9 Response special edition 2017/2018
    Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases (ECTAD)
    2018
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    The third World Antibiotic Awareness Week during 13 -19 November called for stronger action from all sectors to stop the misuse and overuse of antibiotics to combat resistance. Irrational use of antibiotics threatens human and animal health – make a pledge to stop the misuse and combat resistance. Around the world, many common infections are becoming resistant to the antimicrobial agents used to treat them, resulting in longer illnesses and more deaths. Infections like pneumonia as well as HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria are increasingly becoming untreatable because of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Viet Nam is among the countries that in recent years have witnessed a growing threat of antimicrobial resistance, brought about by the excessive and irrational use of antibiotics at all levels of the health care system, in aquaculture and livestock production and the public. This Newsletter is special issue focused on AMR activities.

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