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Resilient Livelihoods for Agriculture and Food and Nutrition Security in Areas Affected by the Syria Crisis







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    Lebanon Plan of Action for Resilient Livelihoods 2014-2018
    Summary
    2014
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    Since March 2011, the conflict in Syria has resulted in massive influxes of refugees across the region, primarily into neighbouring Lebanon, Jordan, Turkey, and Iraq. Lebanon hosts the greatest number: 1.7 million people (including 1.2 million registered refugees), living in the poorest sections of Lebanese communities and in some cases outnumbering local citizens. Against a pre-crisis population of around 4 million, Lebanon now has the highest concentration of refugees in the world, with around one registered Syrian refugee for every three Lebanese. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) convened specialists in Lebanon in November and December 2013 to formulate an FAO-led agriculture and food security programme that could feed into the Stabilization Plan and related Roadmap. The proposed Plan of Action, summarized herein, is part of FAO’s Subregional Strategy “Resilient Livelihoods for Agriculture and Food and Nutrition Security in Areas Affected by the Syr ia Crisis”. It aligns with existing regional frameworks for addressing the Syria crisis, such as the Syria Regional Response Plan, the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs-led Regional Comprehensive Strategy, and the United Nations Development Group Position Paper “A Resilience-Based Development Response to the Syria Crisis”.
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    Resilient Livelihoods for Agriculture and Food and Nutrition Security in Areas Affected by the Syria Crisis
    Subregional Strategy and Action Plan
    2014
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    The Strategy is a dynamic document developed over the course of agricultural programming missions to the sub region in late 2013 and early 2014, which build on rapid agricultural livelihood and food security impact assessments and initial response plans prepared during the first quarter of 2013.With the aim to protect, restore and strengthen livelihoods and the agro-ecosystems on which livelihoods depend, the Strategy tailors short-, medium- and longer-term actions to address specific needs of the main groups affected by the crisis, including Syrian internally displaced persons (IDPs) and affected populations, refugees, returnees, host communities and national and local authorities. The Strategy aligns with national government priorities and existing regional frameworks for addressing the Syria crisis and calls for close partnership with affected communities, national institutions, United Nations (UN) agencies, non-state actors and private-sector organizations. The humanitarian situat ion in Syria is of grave concern, with domestic, regional and growing international consequences. As the conflict enters its fourth year, insecurity, generalized violence and specific persecution continue to force the people of Syria to seek safety and protection elsewhere, both inside the country and in the neighbouring countries of Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey. In December 2013, the United Nations (UN) estimated that more than 12 million Syrians were in need of humanitarian assistan ce, including 6.5 million who are internally displaced (which includes at least 235 000 Palestinian refugees); 2.2 million who are registered as refugees in Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey; hundreds of thousands who may not have registered or became refugees “sur place”; and Lebanese, Palestinian and other refugees displaced from Syria.
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    Resilient Livelihoods for Agriculture and Food and Nutrition Security in Areas of Jordan Affected by the Syria Crisis
    Plan of Action: Jordon 2014–2018
    2014
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    The Syria crisis, which initially emerged in early 2011 and worsened dramatically in 2012 and 2013, has compounded the already difficult economic situation in the majority of Syria’s neighbouring countries. The growing influxes of refugees and returnees, the dramatic disruption in trade within the region and the heightened uncertainty have all affected Jordan. Over 550 000 Syrian refugees are in Jordan, equal to 8 percent of the country’s total population. The largest influx of Syrian refugees w as between October 2012 and May 2013. Seventy-seven percent of the refugees live outside of camps, mostly in rented accommodation and with free access to education and healthcare. The largest populations of Syrian refugees are found in Mafraq, Amman and Irbid Governorates, with 33, 25 and 23 percent of the total population, respectively; with 9 percent in Zarqa, 3 percent in Balqa and 2 percent in each of Jarash and Ajloun.

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