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Qualitative risk assessment update

Addressing the avian influenza A(H7N9) emergency








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    Book (series)
    Update on the continuous spread and expansion of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza
    Clade 2.3.2.1 in Asia (2010-2012)
    2014
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    H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, initially detected in 1996 in China, spread to more than 60 countries or territories on three continents within a ten-year period and has become endemic in poultry in several countries and regions (including Ganges–Brahmaputra Delta, Indonesia, Viet Nam, China and Egypt). The virus infects wild birds and domestic poultry and causes sporadic transmissions to humans raising concerns of a potential pandemic. The recent confirmation of human cases of low pathogenic avian influenza A (H7N9) and bird positive findings across multiple provinces in China since April 2013 in live bird markets highlights the threat posed by existing and newly emerging avian influenza viruses irrespective of their virulence. The economic impact of disease caused by avian influenza viruses is related to losses incurred as a result of high mortality in poultry, to costs associated with control measures including poultry movement restrictions, to disruption of tra de and threats to food security of resource poor countries.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Emergency risk assessment summary
    Addressing the avian influenza A(H7N9) emergency
    2013
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    Booklet
    FAO rapid qualitative risk assessment
    Risk of H5 high pathogenicity avian influenza introduction in Central and South America and the Caribbean
    2023
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    The assessment is based on the identification of main risk pathways for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) introduction, including informal/formal trade of live poultry and their products, and wild bird movements. A questionnaire was disseminated to Veterinary Services to collect data on HPAI risk factors and assess national capacities for HPAI surveillance, diagnosis, prevention, and control. Five levels from negligible to high were used to determine the likelihood of introduction, and a consequence assessment was conducted on potential impacts on the poultry value chain, avifauna, and public health. The assessment also considered the level of uncertainty related to data availability, quality and quantity. FAO will use information from the assessment to provide targeted capacity building support to countries/territories for enhanced HPAI preparedness, prevention, and control.

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