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Conserving, restoring and sustainably using biodiversity for food security and nutrition in the Pacific Islands

Thirty-sixth Session of the FAO Regional Conference for Asia and the Pacific (APRC 36)
















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    Policy brief
    Ecosystem approaches to agriculture for sustainable management of natural resources and livelihoods in Pacific Island Countries (PICs) 2017
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    The policy briefing outlines key policy implications for mainstreaming ecosystem approaches into the agricultural sector of Pacific Island Countries (PICs). In particular, the document highlights key challenges for the agricultural sector in PICs, related to the misuse of agrochemicals coming from an increased industrialization of farming systems across the islands. Ecosystem services approaches to farming have the potential to support the conservation of natural resources, while at the same tim e offering an opportunity for sustainably intensifying farming systems. The document also gives a summary of key issues relevant to PICs that will be looked at more in depth in an upcoming technical guidance document, produced in collaboration with the CBD and regional partners SPREP and SPC.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Workshop on Linking Global and Regional Levels in the Management of Marine Areas beyond National Jurisdiction (ABNJ). Proceedings 2016
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    The marine areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ), which comprise 64 percent of the oceans’ surface, contain ecosystems with marine resources and biodiversity of great ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural importance. The ecosystems in the ABNJ include the water column and seabed of the high seas, and are located far from coastal areas, making the sustainable management of fisheries and biodiversity conservation in these areas challenging. There is widespread agreement on the need to improv e conservation of marine ecosystems and sustainable use of resources in ABNJ at both global and regional levels emphasizing the need for links between regional and global management processes in ABNJ. In various ABNJ regions of the world, such as the Northeast Atlantic, the Sargasso Sea, the Indian Ocean, and the Pacific Islands, important initiatives are underway to adapt existing regional institutional processes to move toward ecosystem-based management of ABNJ and to implement tools such as m ultiple-use area-based management and environmental impact assessment. Experiences, knowledge gained, and lessons learned from regional initiatives in fisheries management and biodiversity conservation in ABNJ need to be shared across regions and linked to ongoing global processes for maximum results and transformational impacts.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Transforming agriculture in Africa’s Small Island Developing States: Lessons learnt and options for climate-smart agriculture investments in Cabo Verde, Guinea-Bissau and Seychelles 2021
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    There are 52 Small Island Developing States (SIDS) in the world. These boast of rich biodiversity landscapes, including a large variety of endemic species and indigenous knowledge that can make them the repository of our planetary ecosystem (UNEP, 2014). Nevertheless, the SIDS are identified as being one of the negatively impacted areas of climate change in the world, with huge implications for biodiversity loss and survival. There is a general consensus that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from small islands are negligible in comparison to global emissions, but the effects of climate change are devastating as a consequence of the sea level rise associated with global warming (Nurse et al., 2014). Long-term risks projected for small islands include increase in coastal flooding, freshwater stress and risks across marine ecosystems. Other threats to the SIDS include more frequent strong winds and cyclones, sea water intrusion into aquifers, and freshwater scarcity (Kelman and West, 2009). The apparent inability of these countries to adequately and effectively adapt to these impacts is the result of a combination of factors, including their exposure, sensitivity and vulnerability to shocks, and the costly nature of adaptation measures (Robinson, 2019). The report includes an introductory chapter, and climate change and the importance of the AFOLU sectors in the second and third chapters, respectively. The fourth and fifth chapters discuss the challenges in agriculture and the needs and priorities for climate change adaptation and mitigation. The adoption of CSA for integrated climate action as well as barriers to adopting promising CSA technologies/practices are discussed in Chapter 6. Furthermore, the capacity development needs required to address barriers to adoption of CSA opportunities and drive sustainable and tranformational results at scale are discussed. Lastly, the forward-looking chapter discusses knowledge gaps, such as the insufficient capture of the fishery subsector in the country CSA profiles, given its contribution to food security and the countries’ economy, and recommends priority areas to serve as entry points for CSA investments.

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