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Enabling Sustainable Livelihoods through Economic Diversification in The Kono District, Sierra Leone - TCP/SIL/3702









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    Project
    Sustaining the Implementation of The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Lands, Fisheries And Forestry in the Context of National Food Security (VGGT) at National and District Level in Sierra Leone - TCP/SIL/3602 2020
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    In Sierra Leone, the implementation of the globally agreedVoluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance ofTenure of Lands, Fisheries and Forestry in the Context ofNational Food Security (VGGT) began in February 2014under the German-funded project “Support forCountry-Level Implementation of the Voluntary Guidelineson the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land,Fisheries and Forests” (referred to as VGGT ProjectPhase I), which ended on 31 July 2016. Phase I led tothe creation of a comprehensive institutional frameworkrequiring regular and ongoing meetings among keystakeholders from both government and civil societyorganizations.The present project was designed to leverage the benefitsof the implementation of the VGGT and to sustain theimplementation of the key emerging activities, localizingthe implementation of the VGGT at the district level. Thisproject provided the opportunity to incorporate lessonslearned during VGGT Project Phase I and incorporateother stakeholders who had not been fully engagedduring the first phase – in particular the private sector,members of parliament, local authorities etc. – in VGGTimplementation. The importance of continuing toimplement key and high-level activities ensured furtherpolitical buy-in and the application of VGGT principles,not least through the implementation of the newlyapproved National Land Policy (NLP).The overall aim of the project was to sustain theimplementation of the VGGT in Sierra Leone. This was tobe achieved through three main outputs:• A multistakeholder platform that continues topromote, implement and mainstream the VGGT.• Stakeholders in Parliament and at district levelsensitized on the VGGT and on the implementation ofthe NLP.• Support for the implementation of the newly approvedkey natural resources-related sector policies (the NLPand the Fisheries Policy).
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    Project
    Aquaculture for Food Security, Livelihood and Nutrition in Sierra Leone - TCP/SIL/3502 2019
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    Fish accounts for about 80 percent of the protein needs of the peopleof Sierra Leone, with barely 20 percent provided by the livestock sector.Marine fish stocks continue to be exploited by both small-scale fishingunits and industrial trawlers, but the overfishing of some commerciallyexploited fish stocks has led to a decline in marine fish stocks,with adverse effects on the overall nutrition status of the population.The limited availability of both marine and freshwater fish is a majorchallenge for the Government and action must be taken if the goalsof improved fish supply and food security are to be achieved.The promotion of sustainable aquaculture was recognized as a responseto the decline in national fish supplies. In this regard, the Governmentapproached FAO for technical assistance. The project aimed to improveaquaculture production by providing assistance to smallholder farmersin communities and groups of fish farmers through empowerment andcapacity-building, the provision of inputs, the strengthening of extensionservices for fish farming and the pilot production of local fish feed.
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    Book (series)
    Evaluation of FAO’s country programme in Sierra Leone 2012–2019 2021
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    The agriculture sector in Sierra Leone accounts for 60 percent of GDP and 58 percent of total employment. More than 58 percent of the country’s population live in rural areas and 86.1 percent of this population are engaged in smallholder subsistence agricultural production. Ten years of civil conflict and the Ebola epidemic in 2014 negatively affected food security and the country’s overall socio-economic situation. The country is particularly vulnerable to extreme events such as food chain crises and natural hazards which have a direct impact on food security and livelihoods. This evaluation aims to identify lessons learned and provide strategic recommendations on how FAO programmes can be better oriented in Sierra Leone. FAO’s overall contribution to developmental challenges was assessed in the priority areas defined in the CPFs covering 2012–16 and 2017–19. The evaluation comprised an examination of associated outcome areas related to support to smallholder commercialization, natural resources management, and effective response to disasters and increasing social productivity and resilience. The review also evaluated crosscutting issues, including gender equality and women’s empowerment, climate resilience, nutrition, capacity development and youth employment. The evaluation used different methods to collect the views of the beneficiaries and other stakeholders, such as structured focus group discussions, structured key informant interviews, direct observation, and workshops. The fieldwork took place with actors from projects across five districts: Bo, Bombali, Kenema, Kono, and Port Loko. The evaluation found evidence of significant and sustainable results in a range of areas of FAO’s activities, including policy-related work, from adoption of legislation to policy influence, piloting of approaches, and standards and regulatory frameworks. Likewise, results leading to livelihoods improvements, empowerment and adoption of more sustainable organizational practices, technologies and skills were found. Nevertheless, the programme failed to aggregate activities and interventions in a programmatic and coherent portfolio. FAOs capacity to deliver sustainable and consistent results, with strong partnerships and complementary action, was often undermined by lack of, or weak systems and functions. FAO should use the development of the new CPF as a way to re-design its strategic footprint in the country and reach its full potential, despite the limiting factors. To do this, FAO could consider adopting an area-based approach, implementing a programmatic, multi-stakeholder and cross sectoral adaptive approach based on regions/districts.

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