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Rift Valley fever

Vigilance needed in the coming months









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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    FAO helps countries prevent and control Rift Valley fever 2015
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    RIFT VALLEY FEVER (RVF) is a zoonotic, viral, vector-borne disease representing a threat to human health, animal health and livestock production in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Near East and potentially Europe and the rest of the world. The impact of the disease on people’s livelihoods (socio-economic) and on trade (restrictions) can be high. Climatic factors are important drivers of RVF viral activity as they drive vector abundance and population dynamics, thus influencing the risk of disease emerge nce, transmission and spread. A climate-affecting phenomenon such as El Niño can have high impact on RVF.
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    Book (series)
    Africa - El Niño and increased risk of Rift Valley fever – Warning to countries 2015
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    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a zoonotic, viral, vector-borne disease representing a threat to human health, animal health and livestock production in Africa, the Near East and potentially Europe and the rest of the world. In this EMPRES WATCH, a description of the past RVF epidemic in East Africa during the period 2006-2007 and the RVF cases recently occurred in Mauritania in 2015 is presented together with an update of the RVF risk model based on in east Africa and the predicted El Niño event ass ociated with abundant rainfall in extensive areas of the East African region. In some locations the rainfall estimates and anomalies for October and mid-November 2015 are similar to, or above, values observed in 1997/1998 and/or in 2006/2007, when major outbreaks occurred in Kenya, Somalia and Tanzania. This EMPRES Watch is warning countries about the increased risk of Rift Valley fever disease in livestock and human of Africa and provides recommendations to prevent, respond and reduce the risk.
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    Book (series)
    Possible RVF activity in the Horn of Africa 2006
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    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an arthropod-borne viral disease of ruminants, camels and humans. It is a significant zoonosis which may present itself from an uncomplicated influenza-like illness to a haemorrhagic disease with severe liver involvement and ocular or neurological lesions. In animals, RVF may be unapparent in non-pregnant adults, but outbreaks are characterised by the onset of abortions and high neonatal mortality. Transmission to humans may occur through close contact with infected ma terial (slaughtering or manipulation of runts), but the virus (Phlebovirus) is transmitted in animals by various arthropods including 6 mosquito genus (Aedes, Culex, Mansonia, Anopheles, Coquillettidia and Eretmapodites) with more than 30 species of mosquitoes recorded as infected and some of them been proved to have a role as vectors. Most of these species get the infection by biting infected vertebrates, yet some of these (specifically Aedes species) transmit the virus to their eggs. These inf ected pools of eggs can survive through desiccation during months or years and restart the transmission after flooding, and then other species (Culex spp.) may be involved as secondary vectors. This vertical infection explains how the disease can persist between outbreaks.

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