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Global forest resources assessment update 2005, Terms and definitions







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    Mise a jour de l’évaluation des ressources forestieres mondiales a 2005, Termes et definitions (Version définitive) 2004
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    Les variations dans les définitions, aussi petites soient- elles, peuvent conduire à des résultats divergents. Les définitions constituent, par conséquent, les fondements de tout système d’informations et de connaissances. Les définitions établissent les limites conceptuelles et contextuelles autour des divers éléments d’un sous-ensemble ou d’un ensemble de données. L’efficacité d’une définition dans un contexte donné dépend de sa capacité à empêcher que le reste (sous-ensembles ou éléments) ne filtre au-delà des limites établies. La description des paramètres de ces limites constitue une définition. Au sein d’une évaluation des ressources forestières, les définitions établissent des limites autour de plusieurs ensembles ou sous-ensembles de données: l’étendue, la structure ou les caractéristiques, les réserves, les biens, les services et l’aménagement et l’utilisation des ressources forestières. En général, le contexte comprend une structure environnementale, écologique, du paysage, a dministrative, sylvicole et juridique au sein de laquelle se trouvent les forêts. Les rapports d’évaluation des ressources forestières mondiales ont toujours fourni un ensemble de définitions sur lesquelles sont fondées les informations présentées. Le développement de cet ensemble de définitions sert à produire des informations compatibles dans tous les pays et dans le temps ainsi qu’à favoriser leur harmonisation (meilleure comparabilité, compatibilité et cohérence entre les définitions) avec c elles présentées à ou par d’autres organismes et processus internationaux.
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    FRA 2000 on definitions of forest and forest change 2000
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    FAO has developed and implemented global terms and definitions of various forest parameters since its first worldwide assessment in 1947. Information presented in FRA Working Paper 1 (FAO 1998) for the current global assessment, FRA 2000, reports on this subject. This paper takes into consideration over 50 years of cumulative experience in FAO working in the field of global forest resources assessments. The terms and definitions applied in FRA 2000 are artificial constructs which help us to unde rstand and describe the world’s forest vegetation, and how it is changing through time. By necessity, the global definitions are compromises, and their application is subject to interpretation. The sheer magnitude and variability of the forest resources information produced by countries, make this so. Moreover, the wide range of forest formations, ecological conditions and forest cover types, which exist on a global scale, make global definitions necessarily broad. One of the major analytical ta sks in a global assessment is to group and classify detailed information from national classifications according to global definitions. For this exercise, there are many cases where assumptions or approximations must be made. For example, in FRA 2000, more than 650 definitions of forest were assembled from 132 developing countries (from 110 independent surveys). Reducing this information into a highly compressed and discrete set of global classes was a major challenge. At the same time, the orig inal classifications are kept in the Forestry Information System (FORIS) making it possible to make alternative interpretations of national data, should this be needed.
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    Article
    Implications of forest definition for quantifying disturbance regime characteristics in Mediterranean forests
    XV World Forestry Congress, 2-6 May 2022
    2022
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    In the context of climate change and the increasing incidence of extreme events, global-scale assessments of forest disturbance regimes are needed to monitor changes, inform decision-making and adjust management and planning. But estimations of disturbance regime parameters can be strongly influenced by the criteria used for defining what constitutes a forest. Forests in Mediterranean regions are subject to increasingly higher pressure from climate change and anthropogenic factors. These pressures take the form of slow and diffuse degradation processes, such as drought-induced mortality and competition with shrubs, but also sudden stand- replacing disturbances, such as fire. Many Mediterranean forests, composed of widely spaced trees, are at the lower limit of the 10% canopy cover threshold set by the FAO for defining forests, while others are highly fragmented and mixed with a bushy matrix, qualifying them as other wooded lands. We thus expect assessments of forest disturbance regimes in the Mediterranean region to be particularly sensitive to the thresholds chosen. We assess the uncertainty linked to using different forest definitions for calculating disturbance rotation periods for the 40 ecoregions composing the Mediterranean biome. Using Google Earth Engine and remotely sensed data between 2000-2015, we apply different criteria for calculating the extent of forests and the areas disturbed within them, accounting for forest type, minimum size, canopy density and land use change. We identify the ecoregions with the disturbance rotation periods that are the most sensitive to these different definitions and compare the overall uncertainty with other major forest biomes. We conclude by discussing the importance of identifying harmonized definitions that can best support the sustainable management of Mediterranean forests, as well as opportunities for making consistent and accurate global baselines that can help improve projections of climate change impacts. Keywords: Forests, Disturbances, Remote Sensing, Planning, Climate Change ID: 3622233

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