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Reducing fisherfolk's vulnerability leads to responsible fisheries - SFLP

Policies to Support Livelihoods and Resource Management










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    Book (series)
    Making global governance work for small-scale fisheries - SFLP
    Policies to sustain livelihoods and resource management
    2007
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    The aim of this policy brief is to: Emphasize that changes in international governance and globalization offer new opportunities for people involved in small-scale fisheries Show that principles and rules of international law are increasingly influencing national policy and legal frameworks – including those in fisheries Review national initiatives aimed at strengthening small-scale fishers’ involvement in fisheries management Argue that national fisheries policy instrume nts promoting co-management of fisheries resources must be backed by supportive legal frameworks Outline recommendations for policy and action to help small-scale fisherfolk exercise their rights
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    Project
    Nutritional condition, food security, hygiene and sanitation in the fishing community of Joal, Senegal 1996
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    Development strategy during the 1960 and i 970s was based on the philosophy that developing countries lacked improved technology and capital for speeding up their development:Industrialization was promoted in order to capitalize on the abundant fish resources. However, the anticipated expansion of the economy did not happen and the development approach shifted towards an integrated rural strategy where emphasis is put on the community as a whole to upgrade incomes and the quality of life throu gh technical assistance and the active participation of fisherfolk and the community. In this context, emphasis was initially placed on the Community Fishery Centre (CFC) concept as a means of promoting artisanal fishery development. But it became apparent that the presence of a complex of facilities and seivices tailored to meet local needs was no guarantee that the structures/facilities would be used or that development would occur. The active participation of fisherfolk and the mobilisation of local and community resources was imperative in order to assure sustainability of initiatives undertaken by development projects and/or the community. So far and in general terms, the IDAF Programme has worked under the context of abundant or seemingly adequate fishery resources with moderate population pressure. The scenario is however changing (and very fast for that matter) and wewould soon face the triple constraints of reduced or depleting fish stocks, degrading environment and incr easing population pressure. Like in other sectors, it must be anticipated that just to survive, parts of the population surplus in the fishing communities will enter the artisanal fisheries, which will increase the competition for the resources among the small scale fisherfolk in addition to the prevailing competition between the artisanal and industrial fisheries, with their attendant effect on the environment.
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    Book (series)
    Increasing the contribution of small-scale fisheries to poverty alleviation and food security. 2007
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    The objectives of this Technical Paper are to highlight the contribution that inland and coastal small-scale fisheries can make to poverty alleviation and food security and to make practical suggestions on ways that this contribution can be maximized. This paper is organized into three main sections. The first section discusses the concepts of poverty, vulnerability and food security, and briefly outlines how these concepts have evolved in recent years within the field of fisheries (in line with the rest of the development literature). The second section reviews the actual and potential contribution of small-scale fisheries to poverty alleviation and food security. It illustrates, through use of examples, the role that small-scale fisheries can play in economic growth at the national level and poverty alleviation and rural development at the local level. The third and main section of the document discusses ways of increasing the contribution of small-scale fisheri es to poverty alleviation and food security through nine main entry points. First, the paper revisits conventional fisheries policies and legislation and makes suggestions on how those can be made more pro-poor. Next, the paper emphasizes the importance of capacity building and highlights how cross-sectoral interventions can greatly improve the livelihoods of fish-dependent communities. The paper then proposes a series of broad pro-poor or pro-small-scale fisheries principles, before discussing in greater detail three of the main management instruments adopted in fisheries: (i) property right approaches; (ii) co-management; and (iii) protected areas. The next two sub-sections discuss markets and how to make them work for the poor, and the important issue of pro-poor financing systems and subsidies. The paper highlights the complexity of the issues and reflects the current debate on the ambiguous impacts of markets and trade on poverty alleviation. The last sub-sec tion examines the information, research agenda and communication strategies that are needed to complement or support other interventions and to ensure the contribution of small-scale fisheries to poverty alleviation and food security.

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