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Peace and Food Security

Investing in resilience to sustain rural livelihoods amid conflict










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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    FAO in the 2020 humanitarian appeals 2019
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    For the past three years the number of people facing acute food insecurity has been persistently above 100 million. Conflict and insecurity are the main drivers of hunger, exacerbated by climate shocks and economic instability. Many countries are facing a combination of two or all of these drivers at the same time, resulting in major food crises. Conflict and climate shocks have had devastating impacts on food security and agriculture. Economic instability has also led to rising food and fuel prices, along with the cost of other essential items, severely undermining the food security situation in numerous countries and eroding vulnerable households’ capacity to cope with shocks. In times of crisis, protecting livelihoods saves lives and contributes to strengthening resilience to future shocks. Rapid and efficient response in the agriculture sector also promotes recovery and reduces the gap between dependency on food assistance and self-reliance. In 2020, FAO will continue to scale up its response to restore and protect agricultural livelihoods to meet the most urgent needs of vulnerable populations, while also strengthening their resilience. These interventions are imperative to fight hunger and malnutrition.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Operationalizing pathways to sustaining peace in the context of Agenda 2030
    A how-to guide
    2022
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    Violent conflict has increased in recent decades. The number of people worldwide who live in settings where conflict and violence are a daily occurrence is increasing. By 2030, it is estimated that more than half of all people living in poverty will be found in countries affected by high levels of violence. These conflict dynamics have a negative impact on households’ food security. Agriculture, natural resources, food security and nutrition can be sources of peace or conflict, crisis or recovery, tragedy or healing. Underpinning this is ensuring that the Organization’s projects and interventions are conflict-sensitive so that all stakeholders understand the dynamics of the diverse contexts in which FAO works. Especially in fragile and conflict-affected contexts, we need to make sure that our work avoids contributing to divisions, disputes and violent conflict, and does no harm. All that we do – both by ourselves and through partnerships – should follow this approach. We can also identify where FAO can positively contribute to social cohesion and peace – and these efforts must be rooted in robust theories of change. FAO is placing increasing emphasis on ensuring that our interventions make a positive contribution to peace – an objective shared across the United Nations system, and increasingly a requirement of our partners and donors. The focus of this how-to guide is to elaborate the pathways through which the Organization can optimize deliberate contributions to peace, and inform the design, adaptation and impact measurement of its interventions. In recent years, FAO has developed corporate tools, guidance and training on conflict sensitivity and context analysis. Operationalizing pathways to sustaining peace in the context of Agenda 2030 – A how-to guide is another crucial document in that series, developed through collaboration between the FAO Conflict and Peace Unit and Interpeace in the context of a wider partnership between the two Organizations. Following broad consultation across the Organization, this document provides operational guidance and inspiration to FAO project and technical staff on how our work can enhance FAO’s contributions to peace – and how to measure those contributions. It is part of an ongoing process, which complements FAO’s efforts through its Strategic Framework to support the transformation to more efficient, inclusive, resilient and sustainable agrifood systems, for better production, better nutrition, better environment and better life, leaving no one behind.
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    Booklet
    Distress migration and youth in protracted crises 2016
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    This note focuses on the topic of distress migration and youth in protracted crises, and the possible solutions from the JFFLS approach, using case studies of FAO interventions. Migration is a common phenomenon in protracted crises, mainly resulting from displacement due to conflict, natural disasters and /or the deterioration of livelihoods. The challenges posed by migration are many: a disruption of food and nutrition security, increasing competition among livelihood groups, ever greater numbe rs of displaced young people exposed to the threat of both violence and radicalization, plus harmful impact on livelihoods in the countries of origin. However, migration also presents opportunities, including powerful drivers for sustainable post-conflict recovery, opportunities for host communities and young people as a dynamic force for rebuilding communities and peace. FAO’s Junior Farmer Field and Life Schools (JFFLS) methodology in various countries with protracted crises has proven effecti ve in increasing the agricultural, business and life skills of young refugees, child soldiers and other vulnerable groups in protracted crises, and thus helping them to become more resilient, productive and active members of their communities.

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