Thumbnail Image

Moving away from poverty: A spatial analysis of poverty and migration in Albania









Also available in:
No results found.

Related items

Showing items related by metadata.

  • Thumbnail Image
    Book (stand-alone)
    Internal mobility and international migration in Albania 2004
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Using evidence from two recent data sources – the 2002 Albania Living Standards Measurement Survey (LSMS) and the 2001 Population Census of Albania – the paper documents the phenomena of internal and external migration in Albania, a country that in the past decade has experienced dramatic changes as it makes its transition to a more open market economy. Albania is a country on the move, both internally and internationally. This mobility plays a key role in household-level strategies to cope wit h the economic hardship of transition and it is perhaps the single most important political, social, and economic phenomenon in post-communist Albania. The order of magnitude of the observed flows is astonishing. Almost one half of all Albanian households have had direct exposure to migration events, either through direct temporary migration of a household member or through their children living abroad. One out of two children who since 1990 no longer live with their parents is now living abro ad, primarily in Greece and Italy. For obvious reasons, Greece also remains the preferred destination of temporary migrants, although – and despite the higher costs associated with it – the shares of Albanians temporarily migrating to Italy and Germany have increased substantially in recent years. The paper also provides a micro level analysis of the household’s migration decision. The role of household and community characteristics, including relative deprivation and the importance of social networks, in the decision to migrate are assessed.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Document
    Familiar faces, familiar places: The role of family networks and previous experience for Albanian migrants 2005
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Using data from the 2003 Albania Panel Survey, this paper examines the evolution of Albanian international migration since the fall of Communism in 1990 and explores, using multivariate analysis, what individual, household and community level factors influence decisions to migrate internationally. We find evidence of important changes over time in the pull and push factors that drive migration flows. While early on in the transition political and economic factors were predominant, over t ime personal experience and household migration networks assumed fundamental roles. Furthermore, the spatial configuration of migration is also changing as both temporary and permanent migration expand into new parts of the country. The results have important policy implications. First, policies aimed at controlling migration are likely to be less effective where networks have already developed or where engrained patterns of repeat migration are established. Second, despite increasing legal ity, migration, particularly for newcomers, is still risky and often illegal. Third, educated individuals have a higher propensity to migrate permanently, a serious potential risk in terms of brain drain.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Diversification, climate risk and vulnerability to poverty in rural Malawi 2015
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    This brief summarises the results of a recent analysis of a nationally representative farm household survey in Malawi linked with climate data to assess the impact of climate variability on farm household welfare, the patterns of diversification farmers adopt, and how different policy factors such as fertilizer subsidies, extension services and credit can affect diversification choices and ultimately welfare patterns. We look closely at three main factors that can affect both diversification ch oices and subsequent impacts on household welfare. First, “push” factors, such as high climate variability make farming a risky business, and can lead farmers to diversify in order to reduce that risk. However, this may lead to lower, though more stable, welfare levels. On the other hand, “pull” factors, such as greater education or wealth, enable households to take advantage of a wider range of opportunities not available to the less wealthy or poorly educated. These “pull” factors should incre ase welfare, but do not necessarily create greater stability. Finally, we look at the institutional context within which households are situated to evaluate how it impacts both diversification choices and resulting welfare outcomes.

Users also downloaded

Showing related downloaded files

No results found.