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Second International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2). Report of the Joint FAO/WHO Secretariat on the Conference








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    Deuxième Conférence internationale sur la nutrition (CIN2). Rapport du Secrétariat mixte FAO/OMS de la Conférence. 2015
    La deuxième Conférence internationale sur la nutrition (CIN2) , organisée conjointement par l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture (FAO) et par l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé (OMS), s’est tenue au Siège de la FAO, à Rome (Italie) du 19 au 21 novembre 2014. La Conférence avait pour mandat i) de recenser les progrès réalisés depuis la Conf érence internationale sur la nutrition de 1992, de relever les nouveaux défis, de mettre à profit les nouvelles possib ilités et d’identifier les options en matière de politiques s’agissant d’améliorer la nutrition; ii) de rassembler les secteurs de l’alime nta t ion, de l’agriculture et de la santé notamment et d’aligner leurs politiques sectorielles afin d’améliorer la nutrition de façon durable; iii) de proposer des options de politiques modulables et de cadres institutionnels de nature à permettre de releve r comme il convient les principaux défis nutritionnels dans un avenir proche; iv) d’encourager un renforcement de la cohérence, sur les plans généraux et des politiques, de l’alignement, de la coordination et de la coopération entre les secteurs de l’alime ntation, de l’agriculture et de la santé notamment; v) de mobiliser la volonté politique et les ressources nécessaires à l’amélioration de la nutrition et vi) d’identifier les priorités de la coopération internationale en matière de nutrition à court et à moyen termes.
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    Challenges and issues in nutrition education
    Background paper on the International Conference on Nutrition (ICN2)
    2013
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    The first International Conference on Nutrition (ICN) was held in Rome in 1992 jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO). A World Declaration and Plan of Action for Nutrition was adopted by delegates from 159 countries and the European Community who pledged to eliminate or reduce substantially starvation and famine; widespread chronic hunger; undernutrition, especially among children, women and the aged; micronutrient def iciencies, especially iron, iodine and vitamin A deficiencies; diet-related communicable and non-communicable diseases; impediments to optimal breastfeeding; and inadequate sanitation, poor hygiene and unsafe drinking water. Twenty years later it is time to review what progress has been made, identify the challenges that remain and the opportunities for improving nutrition that have since arisen. The ICN-2, to be held in 2014, will take advantage of the increased international politi cal attention to nutrition (SUN Movement, REACH, etc.) and ensure the necessary support for action at all levels. The ICN-2 will be a high-level political event and the first global intergovernmental conference devoted solely to addressing the world’s nutrition problems in the 2lst century. Reflecting the multi-sector nature of nutrition, the Conference will bring food, agriculture, health, education, social protection and other sectors together to mobilize the political will and resou rces necessary for improving nutrition and for reaching consensus around a global multi-sector nutrition framework indicating concrete steps to improve nutrition.
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    Fishing for development
    FAO/OECD April 2014, Paris, France
    2015
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    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the World Bank organized the Fishing for Development joint meeting, which was held in April 2014 at OECD headquarters in Paris. The meeting was convened to initiate a dialogue between the fisheries and the development policy communities from OECD and FAO Members and partner countries on key issues of shared interest. It addressed four topics high on the internation al fisheries and aquaculture policy agenda: the challenges of rebuilding fish stocks while securing the integrity of ecosystems and the livelihoods that depend on them; the potential for green growth in aquaculture; combating illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing; and the role of regional fisheries management organizations (RFMOs) in the management of high seas fish stocks and in developing cooperation between States that share fish stocks in several exclusive economic zones (EEZs). The meeting reached a number of conclusions and flagged questions for a future work agenda on policy coherence in fisheries and aquaculture. In particular, it highlighted the need to investigate and publicize the role of fisheries and aquaculture for economic development and food and nutritional security, and the opportunity cost of political inaction. It noted the lack of appropriate data, which results in the lack of tangible evidence on the sector’s contribution to economic development and po verty reduction, and how this also prevents improvements in efficiency. The meeting also agreed on the need to investigate low-cost management options and techniques tested in developing countries, such as co-management of fisheries and participatory surveillance systems. It recommended that further investigation of such options should focus on identifying the necessary preconditions for a successful outcome and how to apply them on a larger scale and in different socio-economic contexts. Anothe r conclusion was that there is a need to improve the resilience of coastal populations. The fisheries sector is often a last resort or buffer for marginalized populations, and there is an urgent need to develop alternative livelihood means (e.g. in ecotourism, aquaculture or fish processing) and social safety nets. The meeting also highlighted the need to leverage development cooperation in fisheries and aquaculture and that a major element for efficient cooperation is the sustainability of proj ect impacts. In addition, the meeting stressed the importance of ensuring that domestic fisheries policies of OECD member countries are coherent with long-term global development objectives and do not harm development prospects in developing countries. The meeting noted that developing countries do not always have the resources to monitor their EEZs effectively and suggested that OECD countries should manage and regulate their fleet’s activities outside their own EEZs more effectively. Participa nts at the meeting also agreed on the need to strengthen the fight against IUU fishing. They underlined the role of development cooperation in building capacity in developing countries and discussed the potential impacts of trade restrictions and consumption decisions. However, there were several viewpoints on import bans given the risks associated with establishing technical barriers to trade. Because some illegal fishing activities contravene international laws and may be linked to other crimi nal activities, such as human trafficking, participants agreed on the need to combat these transnational activities using appropriate tools, such as the Interpol network. The meeting made a strong call for countries to ratify the FAO Port State Measures v Agreement as soon as possible. In addition, the meeting concurred on the need to promote green growth in aquaculture, for example, through investment in productive capacity, research and infrastructure. Topics such as certification and licensin g systems were also discussed. Last, the meeting emphasized the need for developing countries to be better integrated in regional cooperation fora. Several regions suffer from a lack of coherence in actions taken by regional fisheries bodies and regional economic organizations, with overlapping competencies and a lack of political impetus. The OECD countries can help developing countries to build the necessary capacity to participate in RFMOs.

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