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Carp aquaculture in rice fields








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    Document
    Rice-fish farming: a development lever for smallholder farming in Madagascar 2014
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    Madagascar is one of the poorest countries in the world and one of the top three countries considered the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change exacerbated by deforestation, natural disasters, chronic poverty, a high dependency on agriculture and a lack of adaptability. Madagascar ranks 154th (out of 185 countries) in the Human Development Index (UNDP 2015), having dropped 19 places between 2010 and 2014 reflecting a difficult internal economic, political and social situation. In fact , according to international thresholds, the poverty rate is 91 per cent (INSTAT/ENSOMD 2012- 2013). According to the national poverty line, 71.5 per cent of Malagasy people are poor and 52.7 per cent are extremely poor, meaning that their resources do not allow them to meet their basic food needs. Poverty in Madagascar is predominantly a rural phenomenon mainly affecting farmers, given that almost 77 per cent of the working population is involved in agriculture. Poverty also comes with another reality, that of the prominence of malnutrition. More than 40 per cent of infant mortality is caused by malnutrition; 47.3 per cent of children under the age of five suffer from acute malnutrition and the overall rate of acute malnutrition is 8.3 per cent (INSTAT/ENSOMD 2012-2013). Chronic malnutrition in children results in irreversible delays in physical and cognitive growth that are part of the vicious circle of poverty. Madagascar lost 14.5 per cent of its gross national product in 2013 beca use of malnutrition, amounting to 1,533.6 million US dollars and 66 per cent of working-age adults (15-64 years) suffered from stunting as a child, representing 8,287,508 people who were unable to reach their true potential1. In response to this challenge a project was launched in 2014 aimed at accelerating the spread of carp aquaculture2 in the rice fields of Madagascar’s Highlands (rice-fish culture) in the regions of Haute Matsiatra, Vakinankaratra, Itasy and Amoron’i Mania. The immediate obj ective of this project is to develop an innovative, inexpensive and far-reaching training circuit in rural areas. Secondary objectives are to both reduce household poverty by providing a source of income and contributing to the reduction of malnutrition through a targeted increase in the availability and consumption of fish. Rice-fish integration makes it possible to optimize the use of land and water resources, in addition to other available facilities, with little investment by combining the p roduction of plant and animal products. Ricefish farming can increase rice yields by 10 to 30 per cent and produce fish with an average yield of 205 kg/ha. In Madagascar, the actual production of fish in rice fields is an estimated 3-5,000 MT per year, but this could go up to 30 to 50,000 MT per year in 30 years with the expected impacts of combatting malnutrition and rural poverty.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Report of the knowledge exchange on the promotion of efficient rice farming practices, farmer field school curriculum development, and value chains, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 26-29 September 2016 2016
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    A total of 33 participants (10 women) participated in the Regional Rice Initiative – Workshop cum Study Tour on knowledge exchange on Farmer Field School curriculum development for promotion of efficient rice farming practices and value chains. Field visits were made to Sleman (Rice-Fish farming and “jajar legowo”) and Boyalali (organic rice value chains) organized by FAO Indonesia in collaboration with the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries and the international civil society organization Vredeseilanden (VECO) and its local partner CSO Aliansi Petani Padi Organik Boyolali (APOLLI). Following the study tour, the regional workshop was held to: (1) facilitate the regional exchange of knowledge and experiences on sustainable intensification of rice production, including Rice-Fish farming systems and rice value chains; and (2) take stock of Farmer Field School curricula currently available, introduce the FFS Guidance Document and identify opportunities for strengthening of the FFS cu rricula. The participants included representatives from government and civil society organization implementing partners and principal investigators engaged in results assessment in pilot RRI-Phase 2 countries (Indonesia, Lao PDR and Philippines). Results of the assessment studies will be communicated to national and local government for informing policy and for mobilization of funding support for up-scaling of the RRI Farmers Field Schools on Save and Grow-Sustainable Intensification of Rice Pro duction.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Building capacity for integrated rice - fish systems through the regional rice initiative and South - South cooperation 2017
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    This publication wants to highlighted the potential for scaling up the experience of South-South Cooperation (SSC) initiatives on Rice-Fish techniques. This initiatives have mainly used the Farmer Field Schools (FFS) approach. It has strengthened collaboration among farmers, supported cooperative structures and participatory training approaches, especially FFS, and proved to be a cost efficient tool that can be used to strengthen and scale up this technique.

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