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How can fast-growing trees optimize agroforestry benefits? The role of the International Commission on Poplars and Other Fast-Growing Trees Sustaining People and the Environment










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    Newsletter
    IPC News: Newsletter of the International Commission on Poplars and Other Fast-Growing Trees Sustaining People and the Environment. Issue No. 11, August 2021 2021
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    This is the 11th Edition of the newsletter for the International Commission on Poplars and Other Fast-Growing Trees Sustaining People and the Environment (IPC), a treaty-based statutory body within FAO. The newsletter is targeted to the National Commissions of the IPC, as well as members of the Scientific Committee. The newsletter aims to provide information on international events and publications hosted by the National Commissions of IPC, as well as other events of interest related to the production of and research into poplars and other fast- growing trees. It also informs and reviews the main activities of IPC and other organizations and circulates useful information to the community working on fast-growing trees. In addition, it contains a selection of publications of various types, including papers, abstracts, books and new reference works.
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    Document
    Field Handbook: Poplar Harvesting 2008
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    Poplars (Populus spp.) play a key role in fast wood plantations of temperate climates. According to the data collected by FAO during the 22th Session of the International Poplar Commission (IPC) in 2004, about 7 millions hectares of plantations are managed all over the world and 56% of this area, about 3.8 millions hectares, are planted for wood production while the rest has mainly environmental purposes. For some countries, poplars result to be one of the main sources of high quality timber. Fi ve countries reported annual removals of more than 1 million m3 of poplar wood from planted forests, namely Turkey, China, France, Italy and India (in this last country all the production is obtained by agroforestry systems). Furthermore most countries reporting at the IPC declare an increase of plantations for the period 2000-2004. This success is due to the excellent results of poplar breeding leading to fast-growing and disease-resistant Populus hybrids. Thanks to the impressive flexibility of poplars, those trees provide wood for the most different uses ranging form pulp, plywood, reconstituted wood panels and engineered lumber, but also matches, furniture, and fuelwood. This last use implies new growing techniques as poplar is managed as short rotation forestry for renewable energy, resembling its cultivation to an industrial agricultural crop. The present handbook aims to expose the most common working techniques and the future trends in poplar plantations, resulting in practica l guidelines for developing efficient, cost wise and secure harvesting systems.

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