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Assistance to Agriculture and Food Security in Nepal - UTF/NEP/073/NEP










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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Nepal – Western Nepal earthquake: Urgent call for assistance 2024
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    In November 2023, Nepal was struck by its deadliest earthquake since 2015, particularly affecting Jajarkot and Rukum-West districts. It claimed lives, caused widespread property damage and led to massive losses and destruction in the agriculture sector – a lifeline for approximately 80 percent of the affected population. Following the initial emergency response led by the Government of Nepal, the focus has shifted to recovery and reconstruction in the medium and long term. During this phase, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) seeks to support earthquake-affected farmers to restore agricultural production and strengthen their livelihoods in the face of shocks. This document provides an overview of the impact of the earthquake on agriculture and food security as well as FAO's planned response and funding requirements until December 2024.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Food insecurity and vulnerability in Nepal: Profiles of seven vulnerable groups 2004
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    This report documents the main findings of vulnerable group profiling work in Nepal. It identifies the characteristics and investigates the vulnerability for seven particular livelihood groups, notably marginal farm households in the Terai, in the hills and in the mountains, agricultural labour households in the Terai, porters in the hills and mountains, rural service castes, and poor urban workers in the informal economy in the Kathmandu Valley. Based on this analysis, it considers how these pe ople cope during times of insufficient food production and/or earnings, and proposes actions that could be taken to reduce their vulnerability to becoming food insecure in the future. Most of the research on poverty in Nepal during the past decades has focused exclusively on determining the poverty line and calculating the proportion of people living under this line, rather than unmasking the characteristics, particularly the locational aspects, of poverty other than the rural and urban distribu tion (Sadeque, 1998). This report therefore contributes to new knowledge by identifying and characterising particular vulnerable groups of people in broad geographic areas based on their livelihoods. The knowledge and insights gained through this process is intended to complement existing assessments at the household/community and national level, and to help bridge the gap between local knowledge and national level decision-making. It is hoped that this study will draw attention to the need for greater policy and programme support to food security in Nepal. In this context, the findings could inform the design of a food security policy (as recommended in the UN progress report on implementation of the Millennium Development Goals in Nepal), as well as the development and strengthening of other policies and programmes that reduce vulnerability and increase food security for a larger share of the population in the country. In particular, it could be useful in supporting implementation of the Government’s recently formulated Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) which received cabinet endorsement in May 2003.
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    Document
    Licencing and Registration of small artisanal fishing vessels in the United Republic of Tanzania 2014
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    Fish are of fundamental importance to the social and economic wellbeing of the inhabitants of Tanzania. The small-scale fishery of Tanzania is one of the important economic sub sectors of the economy that makes valuable economic contribution to the coastal communities and provides rich protein food, employment, income thus contribute to their livelihood for Tanzanians, however there is growing concern of unregulated fishing in Tanzania. An initial survey of the financial support provided by the LGAs to the District Fisheries Officers (DFOs) suggested that while the DFO operational expenses are included in the annual Local Government Authorities (LGA) operational budgets, the funding was rarely forthcoming. Indeed, in 2013 only 8 – 53 percent of the proposed annual budgets that were initially allocated to fisheries management were provided to the DFOs Currently, licenses are valid for a calendar year irrespective of when in the year they were issued. Thus, all fishing licenses expire on 31st December, and they need to be renewed by 1st January. Historically, a grace period of three months has been given to the fishers (January to March) in which the vessel owners are allowed to license their vessels without being fined for not being in possession of a valid license. The DFOs usually go to the villages in December to inform the BMUs or Village Committees that the vessels and fishers need to be licensed for the coming year. Having been informed of the need to renew licenses, the DFOs usually wait for the fisheries / vessel owners to come to their offices to buy their permits, or depending upon the financial resources available, they may visit the landing sites to actively solicit license fees.

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