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Let’s talk fish: guide for journalists and media











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    Book (stand-alone)
    Comprehensive review of MCS Capacity in the ESA-IO Region 2012
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    Illegal Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing is a severe global problem and one of the main obstructions to the achievement of sustainable fisheries that results in loss of revenue, jobs and livelihoods. The countries of the Southern and Eastern Africa and the Indian Ocean Region (ESA-IO) are particularly hampered with IUU fishing and one of the limiting factors in overcoming IUU fishing is lack of adequate human and institutional capacity and equipment in the area of monitoring, control and surveillance (MCS). The problem of IUU fishing has been acknowledged in various policy commitments that are in force in the region with pledges made to fight it. The SmartFish programme is an initiative set up to promote regional integration through practical implementation of sound fisheries initiatives. It has a strong component on MCS and within this area has undertaken this comprehensive review of the capacity required to implement effective MCS at a national and regional level in order to provide recommendations for how the SmartFish programme can assist in filling these gaps in MCS capacity. The review focused on seven countries (Comoros, Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritius the Seychelles, Somalia and the United Republic of Tanzania) in order to analysis and benchmark the MCS capacity and to identify gaps - these countries were considered representative of the region in terms of fisheries systems and capacity levels (Chapters 2 to 8). The picture that emerged showed that by country Sey chelles and Mauritius had the strongest capacity for MCS in the region, with Kenya, Madagascar, and the United Republic of Tanzania having partial to weak capacity and the Comoros and Somalia having the weakest capacity.
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    MCS for Patrol Vessels Course 2012
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    The MCS for Patrol Vessels course has been designed to form one of a set of one-week courses aimed at increasing effective fisheries compliance in the Eastern and Southern African and Indian Ocean (ESA-IO) Region. The courses are intended to have a wide and general application across the varied conditions and capacities in the region. To facilitate this, a system of course development based on competency based training has been utilised. This works through blocks of learning called 'learning out comes' that are then broken down into 'learning tasks'. This approach, whilst stating clearly what the content of the course will be and what a student should understand, also leaves flexibility for the instructor to adapt the learning tasks to be appropriate for local situations.
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    Regional fish trade in Eastern and Southern Africa: products and markets. A Fish Traders Guide 2012
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    Fish Trade is a major commodity exchange that makes fish to be the cheapest source of animal protein in Eastern and Southern Africa, particularly within the Great Lakes Region. The countries within the Eastern and Southern Africa and Indian Ocean (ESA-IO) Region agreed to a common strategy to increase the level of social, economic and environmental development and deepen regional integration through the sustainable exploitation of fisheries resources. The Program for Implementation of a Regional Fisheries Strategy (IRFS Program) for ESA-IO was launched in February 2011 with Regional Fisheries Trade as one of the five components. The other four components are Fisheries governance, Fisheries management, Monitoring, Control and Surveillance and Food Security. IRFS Program is coordinated by the Indian Ocean Commission (IOC) on behalf of the Member States within the ESA-IO region. Fish trade across borders or frontiers is an old profession in Africa, which was done to facilitate distant com munities to access fish, which was mainly in smoked and sundried/salted form. Trade in East and Southern Africa has increased to cover countries within and outside the region, providing the population with access to fish preserved and processed through industrial and artisanal methods. The range of products has also expanded to include chilled, frozen, and canned fishery products in addition to fresh, salted, sundried, smoked and deep-fried products. The market outlets have also grown from the s olitary fish monger to specialised agents, specialised fish shops, retail stores and supermarkets, restaurants and hotels. The consumers’ demand for better quality products brings on board the quality and safety issue prompting the countries to establish Sanitary and Phytosanitary standards for fish and fishery products. Harmonising trade measures provides a freer market for Fish Traders within the same trade or economic bloc. It also provides opportunities for bilateral arrangements between nei ghbouring countries in dissimilar trade blocs. The conditions under which the regional fish trade operates vary from countries with moderate infrastructure, established measures, well packaged and labelled consignments to those with rudimentary facilities, inadequate measures, and poorly transacted business with high Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fish trade. The Fish Traders Guide primarily focuses on freshwater fishes from the Great Lakes region. It provides information on the various asp ects of the different fish types or species, fishery products and markets to enable the fish trader to plan and make informed decision. The guide encourages the trader to conduct legal trade and seek technical advice from relevant authorities. It also provides tips on qualities of a successful fish trader and successful business. The guide is neither a legal document nor an instruction material. However, it is a sensitisation instrument to promote responsible fish trading practices. It is IOC ai m to promote wise-use of the fisheries resources, increase in per capita fish consumption and increased accessibility of fish and fishery products by the population within the ESA-IO region. Responsible fish trading practices adhere to the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries, which is central to the sustainability of fisheries resources. Good trading practices discourage illegal fishing methods and promote optimal utilisation of the catches through value addition, improved processing a nd reduction of post-harvest losses.

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