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Doing aquaculture as a business for small and medium scale farmers. Practical training manual. Module 2: The Economic Dimension of Commercial Aquaculture












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    Doing aquaculture as a business for small - and medium - scale farmers. Practical training manual 2017
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    The “Practical Training Manual on Doing Aquaculture as a Business for Small and Medium-Scale farmers” is composed by two modules: Module 1 “The Technical Dimension of Doing Aquaculture as a Business” and Module 2 “The Economic Dimension of Doing Aquaculture as a Business” The target users of both modules are small and medium-scale fish farmers. The purpose of this module is to enhance small and medium-scale fish farmers’ knowledge and capacities in understanding and applying the basic technical principles and concepts of doing aquaculture as a business in their daily activities. Module 1 introduces the factors affecting primary productivity, carrying capacity, growth rate and yield in water, the general criteria for classifying the aquaculture systems and the main features of pond and cage based fish farming systems. The concepts of seed production, nutrition and feeds and harvest and post-harvest practices are also introduced.
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    Characterization of the aquafeed sub-sector in the Kyrgyz Republic: an aquafeed value chain analysis and preparation of a business plan for establishing a feed mill 2018
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    Among many other factors, feed is a limiting factor, which accounts for a major share of the total operational cost of the aquaculture sector in Kyrgyz Republic. This study aims to analyze the value chain of aquafeed sub-sector including their possible constraints and develop a business plan for establishing small-scale aquafeed mill in the Kyrgyz Republic. This is the first post-USSR country case study which assesses the current status of the aquafeed sub-sector, aquafeed value chain, on-farm feeding and feed management practices, performance of different actors in terms of value addition and profitability, and feed regulations, institutions and policies and presents a business plan for small-scale aquafeed in Kyrgyz Republic. The study identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in this sub-sector, and suggests a number of development strategies which would improve the performance of feed industry and farmers’ access to better feeds and ultimately support the development of aquaculture sector in Kyrgyz Republic. Quantitative data analysis result shows that the Kyrgyz aquafeed sub-sector is still in its infancy and its value chain is very simple; including only few actors comprising feed input suppliers, aquafeed producers, aquafeed traders and fish farmers, and all of them are doing their business profitably. Feed is a crucial input in fish farming which accounts for about 65 – 75 percent of the operational cost of fish production, which means that a substantial part of fish farmers’ income is transferred to feed manufacturers. Good quality feed is a prerequisite for increasing aquaculture productivity in Kyrgyz Republic where particularly fish farmers are using very little volume of commercial feed as supplementary feed. With potential of aquaculture intensification and lack of quality feed, establishment of a commercial feed mill in the country for both carps and trout may have a strong justification. The primary competitors of a new feed mill would be the existing locally manufactured feeds and the commercial feed that are being imported. Imported feeds are mainly for trout and often expensive and not available in the local market throughout the country. Public-private partnership operated feed mill in Kyrgyz Republic with the capacity of 500 kg/hour is expected to be profitable, with an anticipated profit of USD13 617 in year one, rising to USD 97 980 in year five. The Internal Rate of Return (IRR) of such a mill is estimated to be 19.1 percent, which is expected to be reasonably good. Therefore, the study recommends establishing a public-private partnership aquafeed mill in Kyrgyz Republic that would be feasible, viable and profitable. The major factors impacting on the performance of the value-chain relate to the feed ingredients, feed production, fish farmers, marketing and other service providers (e.g., financial, academic and research institutions, extension services). Aquafeed value chain shows reasonable promise although there are constrains and a lack of institutional, regulatory and policy environment to oversee this sectoral development. Aquafeed subsector can play an important role in aquaculture sector development as it has strong backward and forward linkages with aquaculture sector, which can eventually play an important role in the overall development of Kyrgyz economy. The study recommends various measures to develop the sub-sector including the establishment of additional feed mills and use of locally available raw feed materials, developing and strengthening quality control and inspection facilities, providing training and better organizational management of fish farms and improving the institutional, legal and policy environment.
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    Genetic management of aquaculture stocks in sub-Saharan Africa - Report of a Producers'Workshop. Accra, Ghana, 27 February-3 March 2006 2006
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    The 1999 Africa Regional Aquaculture Review (CIFA OP24), the 2004 report of the FAOWorldFish Center Workshop on Small-Scale Aquaculture in Sub-Saharan Africa: Revisiting the Aquaculture Target Group Paradigm (CIFA OP25) and the 2005 FAO Expert Workshop on Regional Aquaculture Review: Africa concluded that the availability of fish seed is one of the major constraints to aquaculture development in Africa. This constraint is in terms of both the quantity of seed available for producers as well as the quality of this seed. Until recently, the seed bar rier was principally with regard to the quantity available; many producers unable to gain access to enough seed to fully exploit their farms. Most of these affected farms were small, integrated family operations of the sort currently categorized as “non-commercial”. For these farmers, management and investment levels are low and higher quality (e.g. improved strains) seed would likely manifest little if any enhancement i n yield and/or would be excessively expensive if available. However, within the past decade there has been a marked increase in investment in small- , medium- and large-scale commercial aquaculture in the Africa Region. These aquabusinesses, of all scales, are investing in good management; both human and biological. Such farms are using higher quality feeds, maintaining water quality and, in short, establishing conducive environments where improved strains could manifest their perfor mance edge. Neverthel ess, such firms do not formally have access to improved tilapia strains and little research is underway to develop similarly improved catfish varieties. Given the growing competitiveness of national, intra regional and international markets, the central question for investors and would-be investors was how to have access to better performing culture organisms? The FAO Inland Water Resources and Aquaculture Service, through the Fisheries Department Group of the FAO Regional Office for Africa, convened a regional workshop that included private industr y, government resource managers, representatives from environmental ministries and conservation groups to address these important issues within a broad context of conservation and development. The workshop is also in response to articles of the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries 1 that requests that, “States should conserve genetic diversity and maintain integrity of aquatic communities and ecosystems by appropriate management”, and, “... promote the use of appropriate procedures for the selection of brood stock and the production of eggs, larvae and fry” (Article 9.3), as well as the Nairobi Declaration (Appendix H) that provides a framework for responsible use of genetically improved seed for aquaculture.

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