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A new green line: Mainstreaming biodiversity conservation objectives and practices into China’s Water Resources Management Policy and Planning Practice

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    Book (series)
    Terminal evaluation of the project “A new green line: Mainstreaming biodiversity conservation objectives and practices into China’s Water Resources Management Policy and Planning Practice”
    Project code: GCP/CPR/057/GFF - GEF ID: 5665
    2023
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    The project was funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and implemented by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) through the Operational Partners Implementation Modality. Freshwater scarcity and pollution threaten the long-term sustainability of key sectors such as agricultural production and productivity and, therefore, food security and nutrition. The project was designed to respond to this growing problem of water stress in China. The final evaluation provided a comprehensive and systematic account of the project’s performance by assessing its design, implementation and achievement of objectives. Based on its findings and conclusions, the evaluation recommended: replicating the activities and practices within the pilot provinces and in different provinces; finalizing the sustainability plan; ensuring that, for future projects, reporting and evidence clearly address targets and are prepared in a timely manner for mid-term reviews and terminal evaluations; adopting a systematic and transparent approach to the regular reassessment of environmental and social impacts; establishing a bird monitoring system along the Chuan River in Jingdong County; and sharing experiences and lessons learned in indirect project execution in China with other FAO Country Offices and teams.
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    Book (series)
    Terminal evaluation of the project "Securing biodiversity conservation and sustainable use in China’s Dongting Lake Protected Areas
    Project code: GCP/CPR/043/GFF - GEF ID: 4356
    2022
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    This publication presents the findings of the terminal evaluation of the project ‘Securing biodiversity conservation and sustainable use in China’s Dongting Lake Protected Areas’ implemented in China’s Hunan Province. The project was designed to address key barriers to biodiversity conservation. The conclusions highlighted the overall relevance of project design, contribution to biodiversity conservation and strengthening of institutions and networks and the adequate role played by the executing and implementing agencies. Nevertheless, a strong sustainability plan managing existing risks is needed to reinforce sustainability prospects further and certain delays were noted during project implementation that contributed to inefficiencies. Key recommendations made were on the sustainability plan that required finalization and addressing potential risks to long-term impact, the need for the social impact of biodiversity conservation efforts to be fully considered and systematically recorded and that the future project designs should be updated with operational partners to address any contextual changes.
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    Book (series)
    Mid-term evaluation of “Securing Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Use in China's Dongting Lake Protected Areas”
    GCP/CPR/043/GFF
    2019
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    The Dongting Wetlands is China’s second-largest freshwater lake and one of the 200 key global ecozones. Its high biodiversity serves as an important ecosystem for over 120 bird species and many endangered species. It plays an important socioeconomic role in the area as nearly 16 million people live around the lake. Despite the importance of the wetlands, the services it provides are increasingly at risk. Loss of habitat arising from sector conflicts and economic interests of local farmers and fishers has resulted in a decline in wildlife populations and in some cases entire species. FAO intervened to secure the conservation of biodiversity in the area through strengthening existing management efforts and promoting long-term sustainable development. Activities such as hunting, fishing, planting and reclamation have been stopped and most policy level outcome targets for biodiversity have been reached. The mid-term evaluation makes recommendations for the second half of the project, with a particular focus on knowledge management. It recommends a systematic approach to sharing good practices and technical support with learning facilities across the various project sites. GCP/CPR/043/GFF GEF ID: 4356

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