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Knowledge exchange event: Good practices from the United Nations Rome-based Agencies for gender equality incentive and mainstreaming mechanisms

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FAO, IFAD & WFP. 2021. Knowledge exchange event: Good practices from the United Nations Rome-based Agencies for gender equality incentive and mainstreaming mechanisms. Summary report. Rome, FAO. 



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    Good practices for integrating gender equality and women’s empowerment in climate-smart agriculture programmes 2019
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    This guidance entitled Integrating Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment in CSA Programs focuses on a set of agricultural practices to be implemented by small-scale food producers in developing countries. The purpose of this document is to provide agriculture development practitioners and policy makers globally, with guidance, tools and examples of successful integration of gender equality and women’s empowerment (GEWE) into climate smart agriculture (CSA) work, by demonstrating the necessity and benefits of incorporating a GEWE approach in CSA work; and presenting tested strategies for enhancing the engagement of women and particularly vulnerable groups in CSA work. With a view towards accelerating the impacts of country programs, FAO and CARE have partnered to develop this guidance to help policy makers and practitioners meet the ambitious goals of the SDGs and the 2030 Agenda.
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    FAO Policy on Gender Equality 2020–2030 2020
    Gender equality is essential to achieve FAO’s mandate of a world free from hunger, malnutrition, and poverty. The Organization recognizes that persisting inequalities between women and men are a major obstacle to agriculture and rural development and that eliminating these disparities is essential to building sustainable and inclusive food systems and resilient and peaceful societies. In alignment with the priorities set by the international agenda, the FAO gender equality policy, first endorsed in 2012, provides the Organization with a corporate framework to orient its technical and normative work towards clear gender equality objectives relevant to its mandate. The Policy recognizes that a gender-responsive organizational environment is necessary to achieve progress towards these objectives. It, therefore, includes a set of minimum standards for gender mainstreaming to ensure that gender dimensions are adequately addressed in all organizational functions, from results-based management to staff learning and evidence generation. Recognizing that all staff has a role to play in advancing gender equality and women’s empowerment, the Policy establishes a shared accountability framework that clearly outlines responsibilities for its implementation across the Organization. The revised Policy, which will be implemented over the next ten years, is a solid instrument to drive FAO’s efforts towards addressing the inequalities that are still pervasive in agriculture and food systems and to unleash the ambitions and potential of rural women and girls. An overview of women’s role in agriculture and the main constraints they face as a result of gender-based discrimination is presented in the Rationale section of this Policy, to clearly position FAO’s commitment to promote gender equality as an integral part of its mandate and contribution towards the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Good practices for promoting gender equality through rural advisory services
    Case studies from Ethiopia, India and Peru
    2022
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    This publication is the third one in a row, following the background paper 'Enhancing the potential of family farming for poverty reduction and food security through gender-sensitive rural advisory services' and the Gender and Rural Advisory Services Assessment Tool (GRAST). It includes three cases studies from three continents and the good practices for promoting gender equality through RAS of the studied organziations as well as a collection of recommendations drawn from the good practices. The objective is to support RAS providers to adopt and adapt these good practices so that they can design and deliver truly gender-responsive services. Improving rural women's access to RAS can close the gender gap in agriculture. However, to do this both RAS clients and providers need to overcome several challenges. While the challenges women face to access RAS have been widely documented, there is a dearth of information regarding the good practices for designing and delivering fully gender-responsive RAS. This paper fills this gap by presenting good practices as well as systematized recommendations following the five areas of analysis of the GRAST. The case studies confirm that to provide truly gender-equitable RAS, holistic approach and systemic change are needed: the entire RAS system, including policies and institutions, staff attitudes and capacities must change. The perspective of gender equality need to become integral guiding principle within the enabling policy and organizational environment and culture.

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