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Farmers' Organizations in Bangladesh: A Mapping and Capacity Assessment

Bangladesh Integrated Agricultural Productivity Project - Technical Assistance Component







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    Book (series)
    Bioeconomic Analysis of the Kapenta Fisheries. Lake Kariba, Zimbabwe and Zambia
    GCP/RAF/466/EC SmartFish Project
    2012
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    FAO supports a joint management process and the development of fisheries on Lake Kariba between Zimbabwe and Zambia. The 4th Technical Consultation Meeting, held in Kariba in 2010, recommended the development of bioeconomic modelling of Kapenta fishery (Limnothrissa miodon). In support of this recommendation, a first field mission was conducted in November 2012 with the support of the SmartFish project. The objective of this mission was to meet with key stakeholders in the public and private sec tors involved in the Kapenta fishery in the two countries in order to:  inform them about the bioeconomic assessment exercise to be carried out on the Kapenta fishery;  underline the importance of their collaboration, in particular the provision of reliable data to fit the model;  find out more about the Kapenta fishery and current challenges;  gather key documents and information required for the bioeconomic modelling;  assess the quality of information requested for the bioeconomic modell ing and identify any gaps;  draft the Terms of Reference for National Consultants who will be responsible for the collection of additional information after the mission. Based on meetings with key officials in charge of the management of the fisheries and with leaders of fishing enterprises in the two countries, the main results of the mission indicate that:  The fishing capacities in the Kapenta fishery have greatly increased since the early 2000s, from approximately 600 rigs allowed on the l ake in 1999 to 1,098 in 2012 (5th Technical Consultation Meeting, 2012). There are also an unknown number of unregistered and unlicensed rigs (illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing);  The fishing effort, reported by the fishing companies, has subsequently increased dramatically (40 percent increase between 2000 and 2011);  The management system in the two countries is based on a licensing system and the payment of an annual fee for access to the fishery, as well as several technical mana gement measures (mesh size, zoning, and brief closures based on the lunar calendar). The industry is also obliged to record and transfer to the management authorities monthly data on their catch and fishing effort. In practice, it seems that there are no real access controls and poor enforcement of regulations. Thus, the fishery currently appears to be open and free for all.  4  The harvesting systems and the technical productivity of fleets in the two countries are relatively homogeneous. C atches per unit of effort have fallen by 35 to 50 percent since 2005;  Qualitative indicators based on the situation of fishing enterprises show that the Kapenta fishery is overfished and revenue from resources is widely dissipated;  Statistical data available on effort, catch and CPUE, as well as scientific knowledge on biological parameters of the Kapenta stock suggest that only a biological modelling based on a surplus production model (such as Schaeffer, Fox, etc.) is possible;  There is an important shortage of economic data on time series concerning ex- vessel prices, costs related to the activities of fishing enterprises, their investment, and their profitability. Consequently, the work of two national consultants to support this process will mainly be focused on the collection of economic data in order to estimate an average cost per unit of effort (night fished per rig) in each country and for each fishing zone. Key documents for the bioeconomic modelling were collected bef ore and during the mission (or just after). A complete list of these documents can be found in Annex C. These key documents and references will form the basis of bibliographical references for the modelling exercise. A questionnaire was developed to collect missing information for the bioeconomic modelling exercise (Annex E). This information was obtained from a field survey and from a sample of fishing companies of different sizes and operating in different fishing areas (Basin/Stratum) in the two countries. A sampling plan was made on the basis of data from the frame survey undertaken with FAO support in 2011. However, it is strongly suggested that this economic fieldwork will be conducted in close cooperation with those responsible for the Kapenta producer organizations in Zambia and Zimbabwe; on one hand for the selection of those companies to be interviewed and to facilitate contacts, and on the other hand, to ensure the quality of data to be collected and transmitted. Forthcoming steps for the continuation of the process leading to the bio economic modeling workshop were also defined, as well the format of the workshop.
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    Newsletter
    FAO Bangladesh Newsletter, October 2022 – Issue #7 2022
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    FAO Representative in Bangladesh, Robert D. Simpson, accompanies Agriculture Minister to FAO’s Hand-in-Hand Investment Forum in Rome. Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina addresses World Food Day celebration. New five-year Country Programming Framework signed. Huge stockpile of pesticide DDT being sent to Europe for safe disposal after decades in city centre storage. Emergency assitance for farming households affected by severe floods. First Bangladesh veterinary Olympiad. The Ministry of Agriculture, in collaboration with FAO, held a series of regional consultation workshops on investment for agricultural transformation. The Dhaka Food System project has established 12 farmers’ markets across Dhaka with a plan to launch four more. The project also organized a two-week study tour to Bangkok and Melbourne for select government officials to learn abou the cities' food systems. The Meeting the Undernutrition Challenge project, funded by the European Union, in collaboration with the Food Planning and Monitoring Unit, Ministry of Food, is carrying out an assessment which will look at the impact of cash, vouchers, and in-kind assistance (direct food provision) on the quality of diets of the ultra-poor. A major new global climate change report, co-authored by an expert from the FAO country team, Muhammad Arfanuzzaman, paints a grim picture for Bangladesh. FAO has conducted a RIMA study for the first time in Bangladesh.
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    Book (series)
    Report of the Stakeholder Workshop on the GEF Climate Resilient Fisheries and Aquaculture Development Project in Bangladesh. Dhaka, Bangladesh, 29 - 30 August 2012 2013
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    The workshop was hosted jointly by WorldFish and the Department of Fisheries (DOF) Bangladesh, with financial assistance from FAO. The 60 workshop participants were policy-makers, professionals and practitioners. Presentations covered the understanding of climate change impacts and fisheries, adaptation for fisheries and aquaculture to the adverse impacts of climate change (CC) in the context of Bangladesh, and the process of Project Identification Form (PIF) development to access global funds f or CC adaptation for the least-developed countries. A dozen presentations focused on: (i) CC impacts on fisheries and aquaculture; (ii) global perspective and adaptation funding opportunities; (iii) CC impacts on fisheries and aquaculture in Bangladesh; (iv) CC hotspots in Bangladesh and fisheries; (v) current efforts by government and other actors in addressing CC and fisheries; and (vi) Global Environment Facility (GEF) fisheries project proposal development (PIF) and next steps. Workshop disc ussions largely focused on CC impacts on fisheries and aquaculture systems, especially some CC-related hotspots (e.g. the coastal zone and haor basins). Participants emphasized the need to enhance understanding of CC impacts through conducting adaptive research on different CC hotspots. They also recommended possible interventions to adapt to CC threats. Sea-level rise, salinity intrusion, cyclones, drought, erratic rainfall, flash flooding and sedimentation were identified as the key CC-related threats to fisheries and aquaculture. Major recommendations included improvement of fisheries-related national policies and strategies by incorporating CC issues, including capacity building of DOF and communities dependent on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods. Discussion also revolved around development of CC-resilient technologies for aquaculture and fisheries management for the CC hotspots in Bangladesh. Based on the workshop recommendations, a PIF for the adaptation of Banglad esh fisheries and aquaculture to CC will be developed with three components: (i) climate-resilient fisheries sector and relevant national capacity development; (ii) strengthening knowledge and awareness of fisheries/aquaculture-dependent communities facing the adverse impacts of CC; and (iii) enhancing local adaptive capacity to support climate-resilient fisheries/aquaculture management and alternative livelihoods in the face of CC.

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