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Strengthening Food Safety and Animal Health Capacities in Risk Assessment and Management - TCP/ARM/3702








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    Strengthening human and animal health in Armenia - GCP/ARM/005/SWI 2017
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    Brucellosis is a widespread disease in Armenia and one that has a significant impact upon human and animal health, as well as the country’s economy and international trade capabilities. By producing and implementing a new National Brucellosis Control Strategy, the project aimed to reduce the effects of the disease upon animal and human health and strengthen the capacities of stakeholders (animal owners, veterinarians and government officials at all levels) to manage and eventually eradicate the disease.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    National stakeholder consultation on strengthening national capacity for risk-based food import control within One Health framework in Sri Lanka
    Meeting summary report
    2018
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    The consultation meeting “Strengthening national capacity for risk-based food import control within a One Health Framework” was held on 30 November 2017 at Galle Face Hotel, Colombo, Sri Lanka. The main objective of the consultation was to validate the information presented in the draft report entitled “National situation of imported food controls in Sri Lanka”, and to identify the priority actions to be considered while developing a roadmap for effective risk-based imported food control in the country. Thirty-two participants attended the consultation, including high-level officials from imported food control-relevant government agencies, stakeholder groups and resource people, provided input during the plenary and group discussions following the presentation of the national situation report. Group discussions were held on four focus areas: Sri Lanka Customs, Plant Quarantine, Animal Quarantine and Sri Lanka Standards Institution. Requirements identified by the Customs Department included improving the Customs database so that information can be shared with all of the relevant stakeholders, and establishing an alert system for high-risk foods. Plant and animal quarantine groups stated the need for upgrading laboratory capacities (both technical and human), strengthening pre-border requirements with required certificates, and providing guidance on the approval of certain commodities. Requirements required by the Sri Lanka Standards Institution included improving existing regulations and standards to address globally emerging food safety issues, conducting risk-based country profiling, setting up a unit for surveillance and import trade analysis, improving communication mechanisms by establishing information sharing systems among stakeholders on the results of the sample analysis and certification systems. In order to strengthen the existing imported food control system, immediate actions based on these requirements are recommended and include: 1) organizing training sessions on risk categorization for food safety competent authorities, quarantine officers and custom officials; and 2) ensuring the use of a risk categorization list, developing standard operating procedures for sampling and inspection at the borders and organizing training sessions on imported food inspection for relevant officials; and 4) developing a single-window, information-sharing system among relevant agencies and importers. A roadmap for effective risk-based imported food control in Sri Lanka has been drafted, and a consultation with relevant high-level stakeholder representatives to validate and agree on the roadmap is suggested as a next step.
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    Project
    Enhancing Animal Health and Food Safety in West Bank and Gaza Strip - GCP/GAZ/012/SPA 2019
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    The West Bank and Gaza Strip is under constant threat from transboundary animal diseases (TADs) and zoonoses(diseases transmitted to humans through direct or indirect contact with animals), which also threaten food security and food safety for consumers. These problems are compounded by the low capacity of the veterinary services to conduct an epidemiological risk analysis, disease surveillance and early detection; or to develop appropriate prevention and control strategies and interventions. Against this background, the project supported the improvement of detection and response to animal health threats, including zoonotic and food-borne diseases. This project directly contributed to the animal health component of a larger Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) programme implemented by FAO and funded by three other donors, namely the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), the Government of the Netherlands, and the Italian Agency for Development Cooperation (AICS).

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