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Emergency Preparedness and Response to Desert Locust Infestation in Sudan - TCP/SUD/3801









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    Emergency Response to The Desert Locust Crisis in Yemen - TCP/YEM/3801 2021
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    The Desert Locust (Schistocerca gregaria) is potentially the world’s most dangerous pest, causing catastrophic damage to crops and pastures and representing a major threat to food security. It is a transboundary pest with the ability to spread over large areas, destroying vegetation and leading to famine and displacement. Outbreaks occur periodically but are complex to predict. When not managed at the place of origin or breeding ground, they can lead to losses of up to 100 percent of food and fodder crops. In Yemen, control operations against mature swarms, mature groups and hopper groups of DL have been in progress for some years. In 2019, 153 225 ha were surveyed and 13 407 ha ground-treated with ultra-low volume (ULV) pesticide. In February 2020, reports from DLMCC of MAI indicated that low to moderate populations of DL had been found in the southern part of the country and high pollution in dry and coastal areas, where heavy rainfall provided favourable ecological conditions for DL breeding and development. The control and management of new generations of DL is the responsibility of PPD, which was faced by a series of problems. These included a shortage of control application equipment and vehicles for survey and control operations, and, most seriously, a shortage of pesticide. Training in locust management procedures and operations for PPD and DLMCC locust staff was also required, as well as the conduct of a needs assessment. Finally, the unstable situation in the country had led to a serious deterioration of financial support to the main public services, impeding the field operations of DLMCC. Against this background, MAI requested FAO technical support and funds to address and manage the problem.
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    Emergency Preparedness and Response to Desert Locust Infestation in Uganda - TCP/UGA/3801 2022
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    Because of its high mobility and wide and varied feeding habits, the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria is a dreaded insect that can, each day, eat its own weight in fresh food, form dense mobile swarms and travel up to 150 km Desert locust swarms reportedly migrated from Yemen to Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia between December 2019 and January 2020 prompting FAO operated early warning system desert locust information services ( to issue alerts about a potential spread to South Sudan and Uganda Heavy rains in the Horn of Africa in December 2019 created favorable breeding conditions with the potential to last until June 2020 possibly resulting in large numbers of swarms Swarms spread quickly and at an alarming rate Various sized desert locust swarms entered Kenya and a 40 km by 60 km swam was observed entering Kenya from Somalia in 2020 Uganda has not experienced a desert locust invasion since the early 1960 s, when it had devastating effects on the country's food security situation However, FAO had at the time identified a low to moderate risk of desert locust swarms entering Uganda With limited control capacity in Kenya, the risk that some swarms would spread into the north and north eastern parts of Uganda was considered, particularly in the Kenya bordering subregion of Karamoja With a looming invasion threat, Ugandan government officials analysed the country's preparedness in the event of an infestation and drafted a contingency plan Recognizing the lack of knowledge about this pest and the low capacity for surveillance and control in the country, there was an urgent need to mobilize and educate national and local institutions, as well as the general public, to conduct surveillance and reporting, and prepare for control operations.
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    Emergency Assistance to Desert Locust Monitoring and Control Operations in Ethiopia in 2019/2020 - TCP/ETH/3706 2021
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    Ethiopia is one of eastern Africa’s frontline DL breeding and invasion areas, with the lowland areas of northern, eastern, southern and southwestern Ethiopia providing key ecological niches An irregular but persistent economic pest, DL has caused serious damage to green natural pastures, crops and forest cover since the remote past, devouring all the green vegetation in its breeding sites and routes of migration in low lying areas throughout the eastern and southern parts of the country The most recent phase of breeding and invasion began in June 2019 and, despite every effort to control swarms and hoppers, continues to this date The seriousness of the DL situation in East Africa, as well as regular forecasts by the Desert Locust Information Service, indicated that the problem would escalate further in Ethiopia as a result of the favourable weather conditions, which encouraged breeding and invasion well into the winter and spring seasons of 2020 In order to avoid even greater ecological and economic damage, the existing survey and control operations needed to be intensified The Government of Ethiopia and FAO thus mobilized the equipment and resources required to prevent the escalation of infestation during the spring and summer breeding seasons of 2020 and beyond FAO support in the organization of effective survey and control operations in the affected areas was aimed at protecting crops and grasslands, and reducing the incidence of crisis on the food security and livelihoods of the communities involved.

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