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Rural poverty reduction

Highlights of FAO support in Africa (2018–2020)










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    Book (series)
    The role of law in the reduction of rural poverty
    Towards leveraging legal frameworks
    2020
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    Considering the importance of legal frameworks in laying down governance and accountability frameworks, clarifying the responsibilities of relevant public and private entities and defining the long term and budgetary commitment of states, the capacity of countries to adopt and enforce laws in pertinent areas is crucial to reducing rural poverty. Countries have signed up to international and regional instruments that are of relevance to rural poverty and have adopted policies and legislation in these areas. However, a number of normative, institutional and operational challenges exist in different countries. These include regulatory gaps in some areas such as social security for agricultural workers; the existence of laws that sustain discriminatory practices, for example, in relation to inheritance of property; and inconsistencies in norms and institutional mandates in the area of natural resource governance. Even with relatively good laws, their practical implementation may be wanting due to limitations of capacity to implement them. These problems would require a range of measures on the part of state and non‐state actors, including the adoption or revision of laws as well as awareness‐raising and legal empowerment. This legal paper explores the significance of legislative frameworks to poverty reduction efforts, with a particular focus on human rights. It highlights sectoral areas for legislative intervention and identifies normative, procedural and institutional challenges that states encounter while implementing poverty reduction programmes. It further refers to examples from state practice and provides recommendations on how relevant actors can make use of legislation to address rural poverty.
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    Social protection in Lebanon – Reducing rural poverty and strengthening rural resilience 2018
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    Social protection is the set of policies and programmes aimed at preventing or protecting all people against poverty, vulnerability, and social exclusion throughout their lifecycles, particularly the most vulnerable groups. This poster will serve to demonstrate the efforts - and advancements made - in reducing rural poverty and increasing resilience through FAO strategic programmes, such as SP3 and SP5 in recent years. It aims to provide to donors, partners, and policy-makers with the information they need to gain awareness of the impacts of social protection initiatives, and to invest in social protection as a valid pathway out of poverty and hunger. The expected results of this product is an increase awareness of the benefits of social protection initiatives, an increase in visibility of countries' progress in areas pertaining to food insecurity and nutrition and act as springboard to more funding opportunities. This poster will hopefully be part of a series of posters put on display during the FAO Council following a side event in the Sheikh Zayed Centre on 4 June, 2018 called "Scaling-up Social Protection: Achieving Rural Development and Resilience for All FAO Council Side Event".
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    Booklet
    Ending poverty and hunger through investment in agriculture and rural areas 2017
    While there has been an unprecedented achievement in poverty reduction in the last three decades, eradicating extreme poverty and halving poverty by 2030 are still two of our greatest challenges. Today, about 767 million people continue to live in extreme poverty. Roughly, two thirds of the extreme poor live in rural areas, and the majority are concentrated in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. In the past 30 years, private and public investments in agriculture and rural areas have remained stag nant or have declined in most developing countries, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, where poverty and hunger are most prevalent. With the adoption of the new 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, countries have renewed their commitment to fight poverty, hunger and malnutrition, recognising that equitable and sustainable growth and inclusive structural transformation are key to achieving sustainable development and moving lifting people out of poverty. The 2030 Agenda is th us an opportunity to focus public and private investments in reaching the poorest of the poor, particularly in rural areas of the developing world. This task will not be simple and will require changing the way we think and act in relation to rural development. Investments today need to take into account natural resource conservation and sustainable agricultural production, including investing in climate smart technologies. To achieve SDG 1 and SDG 2, each country and region will have to evaluat e its own pathways out of poverty; however, country experiences suggest that both social and economic interventions are equally important in reducing poverty . Economic growth (e.g. in agriculture) is not enough. To promote rural development and inclusion, countries must take specific policy and programmatic actions that reach the poor directly. This should include a combination of social and economic policies that address today’s challenges and enable and empower rural people to earn a living a nd shape their livelihoods.

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