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Biodiversity and nutrition: a common path







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    Book (stand-alone)
    Expert Consultation on Nutrition Indicators for Biodiversity
    2. Food consumption
    2010
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    Biological diversity is the variety of life on Earth, from the simplest micro-organisms to complex ecosystems such as the rainforests of the Amazon. Biodiversity is important for nutrition and health, and can help to combat micronutrient deficiencies and other forms of malnutrition. This can only be done if the composition of foods is known and disseminated so that varieties and breeds with higher nutritional quality can be promoted. The Cross-cutting Initiative on Biodiversity for Food and Nutrition has been established to measure, investigate and promote biodiversity and nutrition. Therefore, nutrition indicators need to be developed to address the three dimensions of biodiversity – ecosystems, the species they contain and the genetic diversity within species. The indicators will measure the food composition and consumption of cultivars, varieties, breeds and subspecies of commonly consumed foods, as well as underutilized, uncultivated, indigenous plant and animal species. The second nutrition indicator for biodiversity is related to food consumption. It aims to report on progress regarding food consumption for biodiversity and will help us value and preserve our planet’s existing biodiversity within well-managed ecosystems, with their many sources of nutritionally-rich foods.
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    Book (stand-alone)
    Regional Overview of Food Insecurity Asia and the Pacific 2016
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    The year 2015 marked the end of the global Millennium Development agenda and 2016 heralds a transition to the new 2030 agenda for Sustainable Development. Asia-Pacific Region not only met the MDG target of halving the proportion of people suffering from hunger, but was also the region with the largest reduction in the number of undernourished people in the world. Despite good progress being made by many countries in tackling malnutrition, the overall rate of progress is less than desired and the re are several countries and sub-regions where the prevalence rates are still very high. The analysis presented in this report will help encourage dialogue and shape a new public narrative towards eradicating hunger and malnutrition and creating a transformative change for sustainable development.

    Most governments are taking concrete actions to address the problem and there is a clear recognition of strengthening agriculture and food systems in a manner that brings more affordable, hea lthier and diverse food options within everyone’s reach.

    This report also introduces a special section which will focus on a different selected key issue or trend affecting food security and nutrition in the region each year. This year, the focus is on the importance of milk and smallholder dairy in view of the remarkable growth in the production and consumption of milk and milk products in the region. The section concludes that the promotion of milk consumption and small-scale dairying offe rs potential for triple wins in nutrition, rural livelihoods and the environment.

    See the other Regional Overviews:

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    Document
    Livestock biodiversity 2010
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    This paper describes the institutional background against which invasiveness is considered with regard to livestock genetic diversity. The human-made nature and extensive spread of a few domesticated animal species for global food production is a feature of agricultural diversity that complicates the simple, negative view of invasive species. The different impacts of livestock species on natural biodiversity, of breed diversity within species, and of within-breed diversity on agricul tural biodiversity are discussed. Livestock production continues to threaten natural biodiversity. The increasing demand for food of animal origin, the productivity and technology differentials, as well as the information and awareness bias, tend to favour international high-output breeds over local breeds. This will increase their ‘invasiveness’ in the market economy if current policy distortions continue. Several measures are proposed to control genetic erosion through uncontrolled gene flow. Countries are responsible not only for control of invasive alien species under the Convention on Biological Diversity but also for sustainable use and conservation of animal genetic resources, and for food security; they must balance trade-offs between these broad policy objectives.

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