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Protection sociale – Garantir une réaction efficace et une reprise inclusive dans le contexte de la covid-19 en Afrique

12 avril 2020















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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Social protection: effective and inclusive response and recovery in the context of COVID-19 in Africa 2020
    Also available in:
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    COVID-19 poses significant challenges to an already strained rural context in Africa. The growing direct impact of COVID-19 is affecting health, in terms of morbidity and mortality, as well as quickly overburdening health care services with negative repercussions for non-COVID related health problems. But even before COVID-19 had spread in Africa, the socio economic impact was felt. The sharp decline in demand and production from the most economically developed countries where contagion had initially hit hardest – China, European Union and the United States of America – has caused a global recession, with direct repercussions in Africa. With the spread of the virus across the continent, containment measures including social distancing, closing of schools, the prohibition of gatherings, closure or limitations on non-essential businesses and economic activities, and border closures may have devastating consequences. These impacts further exacerbate a situation of increasing rates of hunger and poverty, as well as challenges affecting rural areas, including the desert locust outbreak, fall army warm impacts, early droughts, conflict and insecurity. The disruption of traditional transhumance patterns and the creation of new ones may lead to tensions and local displacement, and increased levels of poverty and food insecurity. Despite these challenges, the region has also made important progress in terms of prioritizing social protection as a core component of poverty reduction and rural development strategies, including in the context of the Malabo Declaration and Agenda 2063. This is a critical moment to scale up these efforts to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, and support longer-term recovery for vulnerable populations.
  • Thumbnail Image
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    FAO COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme - Economic inclusion and social protection to reduce poverty
    Pro-poor COVID-19 responses for an inclusive post-pandemic economic recovery
    2020
    The COVID-19 pandemic is, directly and indirectly, impacting health and well-being around the globe. Illness and containment measures are compounding the social and economic disadvantages of the most vulnerable in society. These social and economic impacts stand to cause devastating setbacks to efforts to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Pervasive inequalities between rural and urban inhabitants, rich and poor, women and men will exacerbate these effects. People in areas impacted by severe climate change, conflict, forced displacement, and migration will be even more vulnerable. Vulnerable groups include rural women, youth and children, indigenous people, the elderly, and people with disabilities. The COVID-19 pandemic has also significantly affected migrants, including refugees and internally displaced people, casual labourers and seasonal migrants, all of whom are exposed to high risk of infection. Economic recovery programmes that do not address these inequalities and place emphasis on pro-poor recovery plans run the risk of reinforcing inequalities in the future. Social protection will be expanded to better reach women, children, informal workers, migrants, and other underserved groups. Integrate rural areas into risk-informed and shock-responsive social-protection components, linked with early warning, conflict-sensitive programming, and climate adaptation.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Social protection: effective and inclusive response and recovery in the context of COVID-19 in Africa 2020
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    COVID-19 poses significant challenges to an already strained rural context in Africa. The growing direct impact of COVID-19 is affecting health, in terms of morbidity and mortality, as well as quickly overburdening health care services with negative repercussions for non-COVID related health problems. But even before COVID-19 had spread in Africa, the socio economic impact was felt. The sharp decline in demand and production from the most economically developed countries where contagion had initially hit hardest – China, European Union and the United States of America – has caused a global recession, with direct repercussions in Africa. With the spread of the virus across the continent, containment measures including social distancing, closing of schools, the prohibition of gatherings, closure or limitations on non-essential businesses and economic activities, and border closures may have devastating consequences. These impacts further exacerbate a situation of increasing rates of hunger and poverty, as well as challenges affecting rural areas, including the desert locust outbreak, fall army warm impacts, early droughts, conflict and insecurity. The disruption of traditional transhumance patterns and the creation of new ones may lead to tensions and local displacement, and increased levels of poverty and food insecurity. Despite these challenges, the region has also made important progress in terms of prioritizing social protection as a core component of poverty reduction and rural development strategies, including in the context of the Malabo Declaration and Agenda 2063. This is a critical moment to scale up these efforts to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, and support longer-term recovery for vulnerable populations.
  • Thumbnail Image
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    FAO COVID-19 Response and Recovery Programme - Economic inclusion and social protection to reduce poverty
    Pro-poor COVID-19 responses for an inclusive post-pandemic economic recovery
    2020
    The COVID-19 pandemic is, directly and indirectly, impacting health and well-being around the globe. Illness and containment measures are compounding the social and economic disadvantages of the most vulnerable in society. These social and economic impacts stand to cause devastating setbacks to efforts to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Pervasive inequalities between rural and urban inhabitants, rich and poor, women and men will exacerbate these effects. People in areas impacted by severe climate change, conflict, forced displacement, and migration will be even more vulnerable. Vulnerable groups include rural women, youth and children, indigenous people, the elderly, and people with disabilities. The COVID-19 pandemic has also significantly affected migrants, including refugees and internally displaced people, casual labourers and seasonal migrants, all of whom are exposed to high risk of infection. Economic recovery programmes that do not address these inequalities and place emphasis on pro-poor recovery plans run the risk of reinforcing inequalities in the future. Social protection will be expanded to better reach women, children, informal workers, migrants, and other underserved groups. Integrate rural areas into risk-informed and shock-responsive social-protection components, linked with early warning, conflict-sensitive programming, and climate adaptation.

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