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Evaluation of FAO’s Cooperation in Somalia 2007 to 2012

Final Report. May 2013










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    Project
    Somalia: Project Highlights - OSRO/SOM/106/USA
    Improved food security and livelihood recovery in Somalia
    2023
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    The Government of the United States of America contributed USD 22.5 million to the FAO project, "Improved food security and livelihood recovery in Somalia". The project aimed to improve the food security of the most acutely food insecure population groups in rural Somalia. A total of 41 625 households (249 750 people) were supported with cash assistance and agricultural livelihood packages, as part of FAO's cash+ and cash-for-work programmes. Emergency livestock support was also provided through the treatment of livestock against common diseases and training of community animal health workers. Through the Food Security Cluster, the project also strengthened the capacity of cluster partners and coordination of their interventions. Meanwhile, the capacity of government staff to produce and disseminate tailored flood and drought information to be used in the drought response was enhanced through the Somalia Water and Land Information Management.
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    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Somalia 2017 2017
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    Even with good weather, Somalia’s agropastoral families cover only around half their cereal needs though household production. They buy the rest of their food – much of it imported. Both of last years’ harvests were near total failures, and by early 2017 they had worked their way through their reduced cereal stores. Since then these families have been depending on purchases to survive, often going into debt to do so. Their animals are emaciated, not producing enough milk, and can’t be sold. The seasonal farm jobs that provide up to a quarter of their yearly income have also dried up. People in rural Somalia are facing a cash crunch. They need money to access food and to avoid selling off key productive assets – and they need it now. Markets in Somalia are functioning. There is food on their shelves – but scarcity and high prices have pushed it out of the reach of many. FAO unconditional cash relief payments and cash-for-work projects are putting desperately-needed money into the pocket s of rural families at high risk. Giving people cash gives them access to food.
  • Thumbnail Image
    Brochure, flyer, fact-sheet
    Somalia 2017 2017
    Also available in:
    No results found.

    Even with good weather, Somalia’s agropastoral families cover only around half their cereal needs though household production. They buy the rest of their food – much of it imported. Both of last years’ harvests were near total failures, and by early 2017 they had worked their way through their reduced cereal stores. Since then these families have been depending on purchases to survive, often going into debt to do so. Their animals are emaciated, not producing enough milk, and can’t be sold. The seasonal farm jobs that provide up to a quarter of their yearly income have also dried up. People in rural Somalia are facing a cash crunch. They need money to access food and to avoid selling off key productive assets – and they need it now. Markets in Somalia are functioning. There is food on their shelves – but scarcity and high prices have pushed it out of the reach of many. FAO unconditional cash relief payments and cash-for-work projects are putting desperately-needed money into the pocket s of rural families at high risk. Giving people cash gives them access to food.

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